PHP Warning: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is no longer supported, use preg_replace_callback instead in ..../includes/class_bootstrap.php(433) : eval()'d code on line 110
Cheese in Thailand
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 19
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    1,617
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 23 Times in 7 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by FaranginPhetch
    I I like farang cheese better than the NZ export cheddar...
    It doesn't upset me if you prefer other cheddars to NZ ones, but surely our cheeze is farang.
    ไมค์

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    4,464
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    It is but not what you would pobly eat.

    Quote Originally Posted by mikenz66
    It doesn't upset me if you prefer other cheddars to NZ ones, but surely our cheeze is farang.
    I have a brick of the NZ. [anchor brand] yellow cheddar, most we get here is white, taste a little salty and is an export cheese.

    The yellow is half gone and I have a brick of the white that a friend gave me about a year ago and the yellow is older than that and has been used off of for that length of time and there is not a speck of mold on either, now that alone would tell me that it is not a good cheese and hardly fit for human consumption, maybe thats the reason I cut some for my dog every few days.

    When I worked in Saudi, we got the real stuff, right from ther country it was made in and was the same cheese that they ate, but here all cheese is export and none as good as what you would get at home..

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    1,263
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
    Welllllll, if you really want to be picky, none of the stuff you mention is really "Cheddar".

    Cheddar is a small village/town just outside of Bath in the UK. The real stuff is made there and stored in the local caves. When aged, the cheese that comes out into the light is the "Right Stuff". Check out

    http://www.cheddarsomerset.co.uk/His...r%20Cheese.htm

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    4,464
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Peterg
    Welllllll, if you really want to be picky, none of the stuff you mention is really "Cheddar".

    Cheddar is a small village/town just outside of Bath in the UK. The real stuff is made there and stored in the local caves. When aged, the cheese that comes out into the light is the "Right Stuff". Check out

    http://www.cheddarsomerset.co.uk/His...r%20Cheese.htm
    Well if you really want to be picky, the bubbly you drink ain't really champagne and the blue cheese you eat ain't roguefort either as they can only be made and called that if made in the place with the name,
    But Tillamook Cheddar is made in Tillamook so I guess that it is Tillamook cheddar

    http://www.tillamookcheese.com/

    Check it out.. and a finer cheddar has never been cheddared anywhere in the world.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    1,263
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
    Quote Originally Posted by FaranginPhetch
    Well if you really want to be picky, the bubbly you drink ain't really champagne and the blue cheese you eat ain't roguefort either as they can only be made and called that if made in the place with the name,
    But Tillamook Cheddar is made in Tillamook so I guess that it is Tillamook cheddar

    http://www.tillamookcheese.com/

    Check it out.. and a finer cheddar has never been cheddared anywhere in the world.
    No, no, no, cheddar is made in Cheddar therefore cheese made in Tillamook is Tillamook and whoever heard of Tillamook!

    And the only blue cheese I know about is Stilton (which is made in Stilton) and Danish Blue which, of course, is made in Denmark


  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    1,617
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 23 Times in 7 Posts
    OK, you win. We make a lot better Savignon Blanc than "Cheddar".
    When I was growing up here the food was incredibly boring. Healthy, but boring. The only cheeze was cheddar. You did have a choice: mild or tasty. When people started talking about mozzarella and brie I had no idea what they were talking about. How I ever learned to appreciate Thai curries, som tum, and durian is beyond me.
    ไมค์

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    1,263
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
    Quote Originally Posted by mikenz66
    OK, you win. We make a lot better Savignon Blanc than "Cheddar".
    When I was growing up here the food was incredibly boring. Healthy, but boring. The only cheeze was cheddar. You did have a choice: mild or tasty. When people started talking about mozzarella and brie I had no idea what they were talking about. How I ever learned to appreciate Thai curries, som tum, and durian is beyond me.
    Your taste buds were set at neutral, ready to enjoy the incredible range of tastes you get in Asian and, in particular, Thai cuisine. If you grew up on McDonalds, they would have been ruined.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    4,464
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Seems like the story about the milk maid and her bucket is bullshit,

    It takes a lot more to make a cheese than leaving a bucket of milk in a cave for a few days. also the Stilton story is false also.
    Cheddaring is a process that milk curds go thru to become cheddar cheese, some make it and some don't, if it fails in the cheddaring process it is then mixed with chemicals and goes thru another process that makes it Americans process cheese "Velveeta" being one brand and is unfit for human consumption,


    Stilton was first recognized as a type of cheese at the beginning of the eighteenth century. It took its name from the village of Stilton, just south of Peterborough on the Great North Road, where the landlord at the Bell Inn sold his sister-in-law's cheese, made near Melton Mow bray, to coach travellers. The cheese was never made in Stilton and even today, protected by a certification trademark, it can only be made in the three adjacent counties of Nottinghamshire, Derbyshire and Leicestershire.
    And a Blue Vein cheese made in France is the only cheese that can be called ROQUEFORT, all others are just blue cheese.

    Same as with a sparkling wine made in Champagne France can be called Champagne, all others are called sparkling wines.

    As far as Thai food goes, some like it and some don't, The flavors as stated are a balance of Hot, Sweet, Salt and Sour which gives all Thai foods a distinct staccato flavor which I do not like, some even smell bad, like the buckets of stuff that is sold in markets and eaten here, I don't know if you have ever noticed them or not, but it stinks and the bucket looks and smells like the ones that are brought out from under the toilets and set aside waiting for the honey dippers to come and collect them in some Asian countrys. You can get the same flavors in most Asian countrys but most do have different flavors from very bland to very spicey so everyone can get what he prefers, and most cooks elsewhere have enough pride in their products that they take time to skin the veggies to remove the hide from tomatoes, peppers and bag the spices that are not edible such as Lemon Grass, Lime leaves and pieces of galengal instead of throwing it all in a pot and served in a bowl.

    And it is not my fault that you have never been to the Tillamook area of the Pacific northwest coast, it is a very beautiful area and you should make it sometime, well worth the trip while you are in the USA.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    1,263
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
    Quote Originally Posted by FaranginPhetch
    And it is not my fault that you have never been to the Tillamook area of the Pacific northwest coast, it is a very beautiful area and you should make it sometime, well worth the trip while you are in the USA.
    It's amazing how well you know me and what I have done and not done

    I have been to Seattle and the surrounding area quite a few times. I'm especially fond of Olympia National Park and Puget Sound. And...

    Most American cheeses are crap, might as well buy a bar of soap! And cheese slices, what an abomination! Although I did have some good stuff in Wisconsin once, picked up at a roadside farm stall along with a loaf of home baked bread.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Sydney Australia
    Posts
    6,638
    Thanks
    11
    Thanked 281 Times in 224 Posts
    From my understanding, New Zealand makes the best cheese in the world, free from environmental contaminants, that is common in the northern hemisphere. Australia comes a close second.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •