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Are youth ignoring thai culture?
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  1. #1
    Guest

    Oopsie...

    I have heard people say that Thai youth are forgetting their culture. Do you think this is true? Why do you think people say this? Is it a bad thing?

  2. #2
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    I am not sure whether it is true that the younger thai generation is losing their culture. But I feel that in any upbringing in an society, losing touch with your culture is a very sad thing. Maybe i am exaggerating.... imagine a lion that has lost it's skill to hunt, or forgotten it's purpose to dominate the food chain.... Well, all the reasons that what our culture practice will become an ashram cat where the next generation will never get to know why....
    Live your Life to the Fullest.
    The Lonely Boxer.

    Wanna

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  3. #3
    emma Guest

    question

    What's an ashram cat?

  4. #4
    delawang Guest
    My 2 cents is that Thai people are not losing their culture. All of the young Thai's I know are very knowledgable in Thai culture, history and religion. They take part in festivals and support the Sangha. I don't think Thai culture is in any way threatened. The generation of 20 yr old Thais seems just as "Thai" as their grandparents.

    del

  5. #5
    Vali Guest
    I don't like or agree with any "losing culture" arguments. It is obvious that in every society, youth come upon new ideas and live life a bit differently from their parents and grandparents. Social norms are always changing in every society. Even in the hilltribes, a culture is not static. It is ever changing and is fluid like a liquid in forming the shape of its container.

    Vali

  6. #6
    emma Guest

    Oopsie...

    That's a good point Vali - but how do we get people to see and understand that?

  7. #7
    Guest

    grouchy

    I think the reason that this topic was started may be because of this very forum. Thailand is rich in Buddhist tradition. From the limited exposure I have seen here, it seems that Thai youth are for some reason becoming westernized. Some things that may seem as progress, are not actually progress. Thailand is a buddhist nation, but the youth in this forum seem to not take the buddhism way of life seriously. This passive approach to buddhism must be quite offensive and frowned upon to the elder buddhist practioners. What you young people see as progress, and what you see as important and acceptable, is quite different from the buddhist teachings that have shaped your country. The most valuable lessons are to be learned from the ancient teachings and practices of Theravada and Mahayana Buddhism. Don't forget your heritage, and don't think that a passive practice and acceptance is sufficient.

  8. #8
    rcrowe Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (emma @ May 04 2003,11:09)]That's a good point Vali - but how do we get people to see and understand that?
    I think itís a really good point too Emma but I donít think thereís any need to get people to see it. There always have been people (in every culture) who will applaud change and others who will resist it. The Taoists have a lovely view on change Ė that change is a natural and inevitable characteristic of nature and that permanence is little more than an illusion. I think that a lot of unhappiness is caused by trying to preserve the unpreservable and I think culture falls nicely into that category. Culture is and should be a living thing.

  9. #9
    emma Guest
    thanks rcrowe - I must dig out some Taoist readings and spend some time over them. However, what you say seems to be very different from Chucky's view.

    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]The most valuable lessons are to be learned from the ancient teachings and practices of Theravada and Mahayana Buddhism. Don't forget your heritage, and don't think that a passive practice and acceptance is sufficient
    Chucky, please can you explain your views a little more to me? Can you give me any examples?

  10. #10
    Guest

    blushing

    I agree with rcrowe's idea of change is natural, and things should just be let to happen on their own accord. Two other basic Taoist principles are that life is meaningless, and nothing really matters. So, I guess if you look at it that way it doesn't matter what Thai youth, or anyone else for that matter does. Buddhism, however, is a way of life. It is a culture. It just seems that some people around here live a westernized lifestyle and then say, "oh yeah, I'm Buddhist", but don't really live by buddhist ideals. That is generally the case in the West with Christianity, and is one of the main reasons I was turned off from that religion. But, I think I'll take rcrowe's and the Beatles's viewpoint, and just Let It Be.

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