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Thread: Thai amulet

  1. #1
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    happy

    Anybody know the name of the thai amulet which look like a butterfly ? Where to lend in Bangkok?

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    Re: Thai amulet

    Pls go Fu Lu Shou to see those by Kruba Kritsana...u may find what u want
    He always visit Sg during Vesak day

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    Re: Thai amulet

    I really hope he visit us this Vesak day n give us his blessings

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    so happy! Re: Thai amulet

    i want to know about amulet for a guru named Lei Shi.

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    Re: Thai amulet

    I don't really know if this is the right place to look for because "Lei Shi" sounds to me like a Chinese Name and this is a Thailand Forum.
    My interesting blog about Thailand at Thailand Blog ---> click here

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    Re: Thai amulet

    Quote Originally Posted by maheswaren View Post
    i want to know about amulet for a guru named Lei Shi.
    I think you mean is Phra Reusee .......

    This is what I know .........

    The religion of the Thai population is by and large Buddhist, and decidedly of the Southern Hînayânic School of Theravâda, or Doctrine of the Elders. But it would properly be referred to as Sinhalese Buddhism as Sri Lanka is the place where it first took form. It may also be described Pâli Buddhism for its strict adherence to the Pâli Language literature compiled by the ancient Sinhalese.

    But for a period extending about nine hundred years before the thirteenth-century arrival of Sinhalese Buddhism, a multitude of religious approaches coexisted in Thailand. These ranged from the Brahmanistic styles of ascetic endeavours to the sundry systems of Shiva-Shakti worship, from the Vaishnava and Krishna bhakti schools to the Pure Land cults of the Mahâyâna.

    A great multiplicity of religious forms flourished in the Thai region before the 14th century. There once existed an awe-inspiring variety of independent religious figures such as shamans, sâdhus, yogins and the rishî, that dwelt beyond the pale of any specific community or social convention. These indigenous wisdom-knowers roamed about as free as the breeze and practiced now-vanished forms of asceticism. Such holy men were often skilled healers, as well, and commanded high respect from prominent sectarian leaders.

    In the Thai language a hermit is called a reusee, (lersi) and in Khmer a rosei from Sanskrit rishî, that is, a forest dwelling visionary. As a matter of fact, in the oldest surviving Buddhist scriptures, the Buddha himself is referred to as the "Rishî" in the Pali form Isi.

    In general Lersi are known as 'Ascetics' and are characterised by refraining from worldly pleasures. Those who practice this lifestyle hope to achieve greater spirituality. Essentially they believe that the action of purifying the body helps to purify the soul, and thus obtain a greater connection with the divine.

    Originating in India before the time of Buddha most are hermits and live, study and meditate in caves or forests. In Thailand one of the most famous ascetics is Lersi Tarfai, (above) who lives in the region of Nakhon Ratchasima.

    There existed an opulent fabric of religious diversity that had formerly been woven between the ancient ruling houses of Lopburi, Nakhon Ratchasima, Srivijaya, Pan Pan, Grahi, Sathing Phra, Phatthalung, Pattani, Nakhon Sri Thammarat and others. Stretching across a near one thousand-year period beginning as early as the 5th century CE, a broad range of Brâhmanical and Buddhist schools flourished in the independent kingdoms and principalities that once comprised the Central Plains of Thailand and the southern Isthmus of Kra.

    Numerous forms of Indian religions had thrived there. Brâhmanic, Mahâyânic, Tantrayânic, Vajrayanic and the Pure Land Amitabha and Avalokitesvara sects flourished side by side throughout the overlapping states.

    Bhikkhu and Rishî (Thai Reusi or Lersi)

    Thai temple mural
    Before the thirteenth-century arrival of Sinhalese Buddhism, a great variety of religious traditions flourished in Thailand.

    Independent figures such as shamans, sâdhus, yogins and rishîs (Thai, reusi) roamed about as free as the breeze and practiced now-vanished forms of ascetic technology.

    These holy men were often skilled healers too, and commanded high respect from sectarian leaders.

    They dwelt in a spirit of mutual appreciation with no one heritage having authority over another. The fifth-century Hindu kingdom of Sathing Phra (present day Songkhla) is an interesting little-known case in point. This extremely ancient city is one of the earliest and most fascinating kingdoms on record. It was a purely Hindu society and an important port from the 5th to the 8th centuries. A Hînayâna Buddhist school prospered there in the 7th and 8th centuries. During the late 9th to the early 11th centuries, Mahâyâna Buddhism from Nalanda and Java took root and flowered.

    Khmer-influenced sculptures of Avalokiteshvara and Maitreya dating from the 7th to 9th century were found further in Lopburi (an old Mon capital) and in villages around Nakhon Ratchasima and Buriram in the region known today as northeastern Thailand.

    Essentially Phra Lersi are Indian hermits who are credited as founders and patron saints of various professions such as doctors, religious tattooists, white magic practitioners, herbalists and many others. There are a total of 108 scared hermits that are recognised by name and many others who are not. More often than not the Lersi is generically represented as an old man wearing a conical head dress and tiger skin robes.

    In Indian mythology, Phra Lersi received worldly knowledge from the Gods and taught this to mankind. Thus Phra Lersi are known as Masters of knowledge and are frequently worshipped by students and others in academic pursuits. As Phra Lersi are also credited to be founders of the Thai magical arts, they feature prominently on the alters of magical practitioners in Thailand and are invoked in rituals.

    One of the most famous black magic practitioners is Ajahn Noo Kamphai, famous for his tattoo of a Tiger on the back of Angelina Jolie. His temple is filled with hundreds of statues and images of the Thai reussi which is one of his signature tattoos. He is particularly well known for a reusi with a tigers face called 'Phor Gare, Na Sua' (anyone wishing to know the address of Ajahn Noo can contact me)

    By carrying the image of Phra Lersi it is believed that you will be protected from black magic and evil spirits.

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    Re: Thai amulet

    yes lersi is good for protection against black magic.

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    Re: Thai amulet

    Dear All,

    If an amulet was made in 2536 what does it mean? how to we translate to english normal calendar date?

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    Re: Thai amulet

    Subtract 543

    2536-543= year 1993 CE

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