PHP Warning: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is no longer supported, use preg_replace_callback instead in ..../includes/class_bootstrap.php(433) : eval()'d code on line 110
Cinema anthem and the king
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 15
  1. #1
    Guest
    Sawatdee Kup.
    Would any Thai citizen hosts understand if a foreigner guest republican did not stand for any monarch of any country when a national anthem is played?
    So, to honour the guest's wishes or to honour the host's wishes?
    Korbp Khun

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    6,015
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 156 Times in 110 Posts
    Have you heard of the saying "When in Rome do as the Romans do" or as we say in Thailand "When you enter a town where people wink, then wink as they do"? What's the point of visiting other countries if you don't follow their customs or respect their culture? Please do stand or you will just confirm the opinion of Thai patrons in the cinema that all foreigners are barbarians. So, if you don't respect Thai people then at least be considerate to your fellow countrymen that might come after you.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Geneva, Switzerland
    Posts
    208
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
    Hi!

    2 remarks:

    A)if you are allergic to kingdoms, do not travel to kingdoms (UK, Thailand etc...)

    B) standing at the cinema is also to show respect to the thai people standing around you. I you would not stand it could mean "why do you fools and stupids stand?..."

    Good luck
    Support our friends at PAKNAM and save money, buy your books and click on: http://www.buythaibooks.com

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Geneva, Switzerland
    Posts
    208
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
    deleted
    Support our friends at PAKNAM and save money, buy your books and click on: http://www.buythaibooks.com

  5. #5
    Guest
    Yes I agree, it would be very disrespectful not to stand. You are a visitor in a country that has much respect for their King. If you do not stand you will be offending everyone else in the theater. I am fairly sure that this kind of disrespect is actually a crime. If you are so against respecting the King, then do not go to the movies. And maybe you should not come to Thailand at all either, because honoring the King is part of Thai culture and if you do not accept it or want to embrace it, then you should not come.

  6. #6
    Guest
    Dear Rolf,

    would dare to ask this question for example in a british group? Would you dare to ask in an us-american group if it is tolerated that you play with your nose during the anthem is played?

    NO country in the world accept when their national symbols are not respected.

    If you have really problems with the King and the Royals, you should stay some 1000 miles away from Thailand.


  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    6,015
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 156 Times in 110 Posts
    Thai king still gets respect at cinemas

    Taipei Times (Taiwan)
    By Yu Sen-lun
    STAFF REPORTER
    Sunday, Jan 26, 2003,Page 18

    The Thai cinema and entertainment business may have developed its own violent and erotic style, but one thing hasn't changed -- the expression of love for the king that proceeds a screening or theatrical performance. Before the main feature, everyone will stand to sing San Sern Pra Baramee, which translates as "Bless the King."

    For Taiwanese moviegoers, standing up for the national anthem was also de regueur not so long ago. There were often harsh words exchanged as rebellious students would refuse to stand for what was seen as a propaganda exercise.

    But according to a number of Thais spoken to over the period of the Bangkok International Film Festival, this sort of conflict never occurs in Thailand. "It is not a national anthem that we sing. It is a song that shows respect to the king," said Bangkok-based producer Ladawan Kongcharoenvoot.

    Kongcharoenvoot said San Sern Pra Baramee is usually played before the commencement of formal cultural events such as classical concerts, dance or ballet.

    "Anyone who hears this song should stop walking and stand at attention until the song is over," Kongcharoenvoot said "otherwise you can be arrested by the police for showing contempt to the king."

    "I have never heard of any protests about the song. On this issue there is consensus among Thai people," Kongcharoenvoot said.

    In Taipei, the tradition of singing the national anthem in the cinema ended in 1996 during Chen Shui-bian's tenure as Taipei City Mayor. The Government Information Office (GIO) has now produced an instrumental version of the national anthem that can be used in those cinema venues that retain the tradition. But even in those theaters, nobody these days is willing to stand up for the song.

    This attitude is inconceivable for Thais. "I used to think that it was a waste of time," said Kongcharoenvoot. "But now, I tend to think it's a reminder to show respect to the king. Just a few minutes a day should not be too much."

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    NC, USA
    Posts
    122
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    It is disrespect if you don't stand.
    What's wrong with standing?
    DOn't make such a big problem becuz of something so small.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Thailand is my home.
    Posts
    1,439
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    happy

    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (sawatdee @ Jan. 26 2003,15:55)]"Anyone who hears this song should stop walking and stand at attention until the song is over," Kongcharoenvoot said "otherwise you can be arrested by the police for showing contempt to the king."


    "I have never heard of any protests about the song."
    Gee, I wonder why...

  10. #10
    maipenrai Guest
    I am probably not adding anything new to this topic, but having just come back from Thailand, I miss the feeling of a unified crowd all paying homage to the same person before a film. We do it here in America but we pay homage to the almighty box office! Actually, I still stand before every movie here in America and hum the Thai national anthem. Until popcorn is thrown at me. But seriously folks, as long as the action doesn't go against a moral belief you have (like being a vegetarian or no sex before marriage kind of thing) then there shouldn't be a problem with showing some respect for the people who's country you are visiting. Or just go into the theater late if it bothers you that much!

    Maipenrai

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •