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Need help with my thai heritage.
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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2003
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    AR, USA
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    Greetings,

    Ok, so I'm making plans to visit my country of birth and I have no idea what to expect. Why? Well, I'm 35 now. Moved to US when I was 5!

    I'm looking at my birth certificate and my born name begins like this, "Master [firstname] [Lastname]".

    Are all males born with "Master" as a salutation?

    Thank you for any help.

  2. #2
    delawang Guest
    That sounds like the translator was trying to get the titles correct in English. The common titles for children are "dek ying" for girls and "dek chai" for little boys. These are used only in writing. Many rural areas still do not have birth certificates and use the household registration to get ID papers, so your Thai birth certificate is actually quite an item.

    Are you still in touch with your family? Are you nervous? how do you feel about going back?

  3. #3
    Join Date
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    Excited?.....Yes and No. I want to see the country and culture, however "meeting the family" thing hasn't always been one of my strong points.

    I have an older brother, a grandmother, and others still living in Thailand. My father is now a monk. It's like meeting total strangers! In addition, I can't read nor write Thai - I'm only capable of a few words and phrases.

    I do recall my village - I think it's Ubon Thani (but then my birth certificate is about destroyed!). I have pictures of my childhood and I find it difficult to remember.

    Apprehensive? Anxiety? about visiting Thailand....Yes!!

    Thank you for your response. If I may, might I ask other questions regarding this topic?

  4. #4
    delawang Guest
    Ubon thirty years ago, just as the US was pulling out of Vietnam. Wow.

    I think it will be a lot easier to meet your Thai family than the usual "meeting the family experience". Thailand is like one big family sometimes; you will find you have many brothers and sisters, and many aunts and uncles. If you have any questions about anything else feel free to post or email, and I hope you have time to write a little bit about the experience.

    Your father will be very glad to see you, but a monk is not a retired person; he will have responsibilities and it is difficult to get time off. Also, he will not be able to eat in the afternoon. The last meal of the day for monks is at around 11:00 AM and that will be a good time to talk to him. Sorry if I am telling you thing you already know.

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