PHP Warning: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is no longer supported, use preg_replace_callback instead in ..../includes/class_bootstrap.php(433) : eval()'d code on line 110
The tradition of freeing birds, fish, turtles etc.
Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    Guest
    From a westerner`s point of view this tradition sure doesn`t fall into the category of Tham Bun or making merit.
    I`d say on the contrary. Where do all these animal come from in the first place? From the dwindling nature in Thailand. I`ve even heard that they make the birds addicted to drugs so they will return to the owner to "go another round".
    It is kind of like a GP deliberately inflicting a wound on someone and then patching him up later. I fail to see the merit in that more like hippocracy.
    But that is probably just another aspect where thai and farang views on things differ.

    Michael

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Paknam, Samut Prakan, Thailand
    Posts
    1,749
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post

    so happy!

    It is not only you that feel like this. A lot of Thai people do too. I read in the paper not long ago that a monk banned these people from selling birds in the temple. But they still continued to do it on the sidewalk outside the temple.

    I never really stopped to think about what you said before. It is part of thai tradition that has been going on for generations. My parents did it and so I did too. It feels like a good thing we are doing. I think every country has traditions like this that when you stop and think about it you are really doing something strange.

    At least I said a prayer and wished the bird good luck for the future as I let it free. What do the foreigners say when they set birds and turtles free at temples in Thailand? Most of them are not even Buddhists.

    After I read the newspaper story I certainly think twice now. But, you have to understand that it is not always like you say. One temple I visited I saw them catching wild fish and turtles in the nearby river. They are not all "recycled". But, it is food for thought what you say.
    Support the forum and chat rooms and buy computer software and books for learning Thai at www.BuyThaiBooks.com

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Paknam, Samut Prakan, Thailand
    Posts
    1,749
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
    I just found the story in the Bangkok Post on this subject. You might find it interesting.

    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]Temple slams age-old practice

    Buying animals for release `cruel, sinful'

    Sunthorn Pongpao - Ayutthaya

    A famous temple in Phra Nakhon Si Ayutthaya district has denounced the sale of birds, fish and turtles for release for merit-making as a cruel and sinful practice.

    Phra Pipatwaraporn, deputy abbot of Wat Phananchoeng, said vendors were tormenting the animals _ putting fish and turtles in plastic bags and birds in cages for sale in front of the temple.

    Buying and freeing these animals was not merit-making but a sin, he said. The released animals would only be caught for sale again and again, the monk said. Help was needed from the highway police and the municipality to prevent the sale of animals along the road in front of the temple.

    The stalls were moved out of the temple compound about five years ago, following complaints from visitors that if they refused to buy the animals they would later find their vehicles had been scratched.

    Phra Pipatwaraporn said visitors could make merit by buying feed for fish in the temple's pond instead.

    There are about 20 stalls in front of Wat Phananchoeng selling fish for 30 baht a bag, turtles for 40 baht each and birds at 15 baht per cage.

    An announcement was recently put up in the temple compound warning visitors against buying aminals from these vendors.

    Patcharee Paksakoonnee, 22, a regular visitor, said she agreed with the temple's objection to the sale of animals.

    Vendor Chanai Khanthakorn denied tormenting animals.

    She had never kept the fish in plastic bags all day, and often changed the fish in the bags on display.

    She bought the fish from farms and did not catch them from streams.

    Her business was not thriving but it was a living. She had been laid off from a factory.

    Art Ruenpaksap, 21, said his shop had originally been opened by his father, but business had fallen off since the temple put up the warning sign. Some animals for sale in his store were from a canal in his neighbourhood and some were bought from other villagers, he said.
    Support the forum and chat rooms and buy computer software and books for learning Thai at www.BuyThaiBooks.com

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    6,015
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 156 Times in 110 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]Making merit ‘endangered’

    The Nation, Published on Dec 10, 2003

    The practice of releasing animals in order to make merit has dwindled since December 4, when authorities began enforcing the endangered species act of 1992, forestry official said.

    Although the sale of animals is allowed, said deputy forestry police commander Chatkanok Kheosongsaeng, endangered species stipulated by the 1992 Act, including the turtle known as tao na and perching birds known locally as krajip, are barred from animal markets, although the sale of Japanese turtles is not. Chatkanok added that animal sellers had been warned against the sale of illegal species, which carries a fine of up to Bt40,000 or a prison term of up to four years.

    Supawadee Jamjareekun, who has been wholesaling and retailing animals for over 50 years in Bangkok’s riverside district of Thewet, said the ban had affected sales of birds and turtles used for making merit.

    Montha Chomprasert, who sells fish at Therawat market, said the ban had affected her business and she wanted it lifted, saying she was only continuing an ancient tradition.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    65
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    when i was visiting thailand last december we released a lot of animals (birds and fish) and i never thought of that. i just thought that the people breed the animals and then sell them and the animals are free, never thought that the animals were captured or drugged or anything like that... won't be doing that when i go back in june!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Massachusetts, Florida, and Thailand
    Posts
    53
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Well, not that it's practiced in churches or synogouges today any more, If you look at the old testement, there are lots of rituals to sacrifice the animal at the alter and burn it "because God likes the smell of burning flesh". I always think of that when I see the Buddhist merit making ritual in Thailand. It just seems so much nicer.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •