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  1. #11
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    Re: "Please reply in Thai, so...."

    Quote Originally Posted by suvois View Post
    Thank you very much again guys!

    1) I noticed all your versions have no "so" translated between the first and second half of the sentence. Is this not done in Thai language, or is the next one also possible/better?

    กรุณา ตอบ เป็น ภาษาไทย...จึง ผม จะ ได้ สามารถ เรียนรู้ จากนั้น

    2) Is "ตอบ ใน" right in the meaning of "reply in" too? Or has this to be "ตอบ เป็น". In last case, is "ตอบ" used in Thai (in this sentence) as a noun like "(the) reply (has) to be (in)" ?

    3) Why do the example of Moxy have two forms of "be able to"?
    Or will be "กรุณา ตอบ เป็น ภาษาไทย...ผม จะ ได้ เรียนรู้ จากนั้น" okay too?
    (1) the "so" would not be translated here... wouldn't fit in the translation here, so just leave it out.
    The "I", the "be able to" can or can not be used in the translation.

    The "from it" in Moxy's translation should be left out, can not be used in the translation.

    Apart from that, and apart from the "โอกาส" in Pailin's translation, they're correct translations in their own style.

    (sorry to say your translation "โปรด ครับ ตอบ ใน ภาษาไทย ดังนั้น ผม ได้ การเรียน" was wrong - but it can be understood)

    ** before correcting Pailin and Moxy, I asked my gf. what she thought about their translations and to see if I hadn't made any mistake either in my earlier post.
    It's one thing to suggest a translation, another to start commenting or "correcting" someone else's : in the last case I'd rather be very sure and ask advice.
    My style is rather straightforward (evading mistakes ), so it is especially difficult for me to evaluate Moxy's style which is more elaborate. That's where it's handy to have a Thai gf. who was positive about Moxy's wording - except to leave out the จากนั้น which doesn't fit there**

    My politeness was rather limited to "ได้ไหม" which would be translated here as "could you (reply in Thai)"
    Pailin used the ช่วย....นะ which would also my style.

    2) both of them can be used.... ตอบ stays a verb

    3) the example of Moxy has only 1 form of "able to" : สามารถ

    the ได้ which I and Moxy use is a different word which I wouldn't know how to translate in English. Apart from hearing it a lot in this meaning, I wouldn't know how to learn or teach it...
    It has a sense of "receiving, getting, beget,..."

  2. #12
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    Re: "Please reply in Thai, so...."

    Thanks for your elaborate reply kpoyd.
    Trying to eliminate the less good ones and finding my own style I was courious this would be a good one (grammaticly) too:

    กรุณา ตอบ ใน ภาษา ไทย นะ เพื่อ ผม จะ ได้ เรียนรู้

    By the way: can I replace "นะ" by "ครับ"? (in this case)

  3. #13
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    Re: "Please reply in Thai, so...."

    Quote Originally Posted by suvois View Post
    Thanks for your elaborate reply kpoyd.
    Trying to eliminate the less good ones and finding my own style I was courious this would be a good one (grammaticly) too:

    กรุณา ตอบ ใน ภาษา ไทย นะ เพื่อ ผม จะ ได้ เรียนรู้

    By the way: can I replace "นะ" by "ครับ"? (in this case)
    I asked my gf. to be sure... it's OK, but now I hear that you shouldn't use "ใน" here, but "เป็น"

    I used เป็น in my translation because I always do as it sounds more natural to me, but I said that ใน was also OK when you asked about it - I thought so, but my gf says should use เป็น here...
    the นะ and ครับ are 2 different words and meanings, but they have the same goal of making something more polite, both in their own way. ครับ is just the polite particle - as you know I guess, and นะ makes what you say "softer", thus more polite.
    Both are very often used in combination : .....นะครับ

  4. #14
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    Re: "Please reply in Thai, so...."

    Please, reply in Thai, so I'm able to learn from it."
    (Sorry if the translation in English isn't okay either)

    This is what I have so far:
    โปรด ครับ ตอบ ใน ภาษาไทย ดังนั้น ผม ได้ การเรียน

    .................................................. ........

    My translated versions are:

    1. ช่วยตอบเป็นภาษาไทยเพื่อที่ว่าผมจะได้เรียนรู้จากมัน
    2. กรุณาตอบเป็นภาษาไทยเพื่อที่ว่าผมจะได้เรียนรู้จากมัน

    - You can use either "ช่วย" or "กรุณา" for 'please'. ช่วย is colloquial whereas กรุณา is very formal.

    You can also use " โปรด". It's rather formal but, in the same time, it's also obsolete (I'm not sure if I can use the word obsolete here as my first language is Thai, not English. I want to mean that it's quite old fashioned to use this word in these days).

    However, โปรด is still commonly used on certain circumstances these days when it is a warning or request made to the public. For example, Please keep clean = โปรดรักษาความสะอาดม; Please do not walk on the grass= โปรดอย่าเดินตัดสนามหญ้า.

    - You should write the Thai version in one sentence (It should not be separated into two sentences/parts).


    - "so" can be translated as เพื่อที่ว่า. Personally, I think that 'so' can be excluded from the Thai version to make the sentence sound more natural. It can be:

    3. กรุณาตอบเป็นภาษาไทย ผมจะได้เรียนรู้จากมัน

    Note that I wrote the translated version into 2 sentences, separated by a space. It's just like when you write in English:

    Please reply in Thai. I can (am able to) learn from it.


    - จะได้" is equivalent to 'to be able to do something/ inorder to be able to do something'.


    - "learn" can be translated as เรียน (less formal) or เรียนรู้ (more formal)


    - "from it" can be translated as จากมัน. This is fine becuase it/มัน refers to the reply in Thai.

    If you want to make the translated version more formal, you may translated from the following sentence:

    Please reply in Thai, so I'm able to learn from your reply in Thai.


    กรุณาตอบเป็นภาษาไทย ผมจะได้เรียนรู้จากการตอบเป็นภาษาไทยของคุณ

    your = ของ

    reply (n.) = การตอบ, สิ่งที่ตอบ, คำตอบ

    in = เป็น ('in' as a preposion can be translated as ใน (like 'inside'). However, when 'in' is put in front of 'a particular language' should be translated as เป็น.

    For example:

    I live in Thailand.
    ฉัน อยู่ ใน ประเทศไทย

    I write a letter in Thai.
    ฉัน เขียน จดหมาย เป็น ภาษาไทย

    I hope this would help.

  5. #15
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    Re: "Please reply in Thai, so...."

    There was a typo
    My interesting blog about Thailand at Thailand Blog ---> click here

  6. #16
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    Re: "Please reply in Thai, so...."

    Quote Originally Posted by literacy View Post
    - You can use either "ช่วย" or "กรุณา" for 'please'. ช่วย is colloquial whereas กรุณา is very formal.

    You can also use " โปรด". It's rather formal but, in the same time, it's also obsolete (I'm not sure if I can use the word obsolete here as my first language is Thai, not English. I want to mean that it's quite old fashioned to use this word in these days).

    However, โปรด is still commonly used on certain circumstances these days when it is a warning or request made to the public. For example, Please keep clean = โปรดรักษาความสะอาดม; Please do not walk on the grass= โปรดอย่าเดินตัดสนามหญ้า.
    I don't think you should use the word "obsolete" here. (my first language isn't English either - so I can be wrong)
    As far as I know obsolete = no longer in use/used, but โปรด is still often used, but just in specific cases or usage. Like the examples you gave; or all the time at the airport when the announcer says : "โปรดทราบ ...etc..." would be something like "Please be informed...etc..."

    What I mean is, I never heard the word "โปรด" when just talking to anyone (on average 50% of my talking is in Thai, 90% of my writing / chatting is in Thai), but it is still used regularely. So it's not obsolete, just not used in everyday speech. Which makes it a "formal word" then instead of obsolete ?

  7. #17
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    Re: "Please reply in Thai, so...."

    "Please, reply in Thai, so I'm able to learn from it."

    I suggest you make it simple as "กรุณาตอบเป็นภาษาไทย เพื่อที่ผมจะได้เรียนรู้"

    "โปรดตอบเป็นภาษาไทย เพื่อที่ผมจะได้เรียนรู้"

    please = กรุณา, โปรด

    When you try to translate into Thai word by word, sometimes it doesn't make sense. I would not mess with particles, like นะ. If you don't understand how to use particles, avoid using it. The sentence can be complete without a particle.

  8. #18
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    Re: "Please reply in Thai, so...."

    Quote Originally Posted by Suzie View Post
    "Please, reply in Thai, so I'm able to learn from it."

    I suggest you make it simple as "กรุณาตอบเป็นภาษาไทย เพื่อที่ผมจะได้เรียนรู้"

    "โปรดตอบเป็นภาษาไทย เพื่อที่ผมจะได้เรียนรู้"

    When you try to translate into Thai word by word, sometimes it doesn't make sense.
    This is exactly what I try : keep it simple, because the more words and the more difficult - would mean the more mistakes I can make. My suggestion was even more simple than yours, so I could make fewer mistakes...

    And instead of translating by words, have to translate by meaning.... and sometimes the correct meaning has completly different words

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