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Topic of the Week: Chinese New Year
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  1. #1
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    Chinese New Year


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    SavageAngel (03-02-11)

  3. #2
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    Re: Chinese New Year

    These are some of the pictures that I took of the feast for Chinese Gods using my iPhone.

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    Khun Don (03-02-11)

  5. #3
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    Re: Chinese New Year

    Erm, maybe it's cultural differences i.e. Chinese Thais and other Chinese did it differently, but I was thinking cos I did not see the idols of any gods and it is done in the open at the residential entrance in the some of the pictures (though of course, it could be to the Jade Emperor of Heavens; then again, the usual practice is such that his offering is almost always made close to midnight on the eve of CNY):

    Usually, when the Chinese pray and make offerings to Chinese gods, the offerings have to be put on a table as a form of respect. Rather, the offerings made to wandering spirits can be, and usually are, put on the ground. I'm just thinking; could the offerings be to the spirits in the area to ensure a good year instead of to the gods? Or perhaps things are just done differently in Thailand.
    Sleep, little one, close your eyes, mother will sing you a lullaby... Sleep in a jewel cradle, sleep, mother will rock you.
    If you don't sleep the midges will go for your eyes and pollen will fall on the cradle....Sleep, close your eyes...
    - Isaan folksong, from "The Price of a Life" (Onkom, 1997)

  6. #4
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    Re: Chinese New Year

    There were tables set up in front of other shrines. For example, in front of the spirit house which is for the guardian spirit of the land. This was the main one.

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    yy (04-02-11)

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