PHP Warning: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is no longer supported, use preg_replace_callback instead in ..../includes/class_bootstrap.php(433) : eval()'d code on line 110
Songkran Festival
Page 1 of 5 1234 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 47
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    6,015
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 156 Times in 110 Posts

    talking

    Songkran, the traditional Thai New Year celebrations, take place during April 13 - 15. Across the country, it's a time for laughter and entertainment ... for religious ceremonies and merit-making ... for families and friends.
    And of course for splashing water -- lots of it!

    A spirit of good-natured fun permeates the holiday season. Songkran embodies the essential caring and unity at the core of Thai society - enduring qualities that make Thailand truly amazing.

    BANGKOK VENUES

    Throughout the festive week, Ratchadamnern Klang Avenue bathes in the full splendour of the Grand Songkran theme. The Thai New Year is celebrated with dazzling light-and-sound displays, spectacular art forms crafted from jets of water such as the mesmerising dancing fountains, and other festive décor being seen along the streets from the Sapan Panfah intersection to Rattanakosin Hotel.
    GRAND SONGKRAN FESTIVITIES & RITUALS

    SONGKRAN PARADE & CONTEST
    At the Maha Chesadabodin Pavilion and Plaza
    featuring a total of 76 colourful parades, each portraying the cultural diversity of each of the provinces of Thailand.

    BUDDHIST TRADITIONS
    APRIL 12 - 14, 2003
    Time-honoured Buddhist customs and ancient Buddhist merit-making traditions such as the bathing ritual in which lustral water is sprinkled over Buddha images and the building of sand stupas that are decorated with colourful flags and flowers can be seen at the 9 key Buddhist temples dotted around Rattanakosin Island and a total of 50 other temples around the city of Bangkok.

    PROCESSION OF THE PHRA BUDDHA
    SIHING BUDDHA IMAGE
    APRIL 12, 2003
    Phra Buddha Sihing, a sacred Buddha image greatly revered by the community, is escorted in a religious procession through the streets of the Kingdom's capital crossing from the eastern bank of the Chao Phraya River to the western bank, the site of the former capital of Thonburi, offering an opportunity for residents of the city to participate in the ancient bathing ritual performed as a gesture of respect and worship. Once the journey has been completed, the Phra Buddha Sihing Buddha image is installed in a ceremonial pavilion or mandapa at Sanam Luang (Royal Ground) for three days, presenting further opportunities for the residents of Bangkok to pay their respects in accordance with the ancient Songkran New Year Buddhist merit-making tradition and customs.

    BUDDHIST MERIT-MAKING RITUALS AT SANAM LUANG ROYAL GROUND
    APRIL 13, 2003 (Sunday)/ 06:30 - 08:30
    At the Ceremonial Pavilion at Sanam Luang Royal Ground

    Offerings of food, flowers, incense, candles and other sacred items are presented to 221 Buddhist monks. Once the offerings have been made, a traditional bathing ritual is performed.

    TRADITIONAL SONGKRAN FESTIVITIES &
    THE PRESERVATION OF THAI CULTURE & HERITAGE
    At the Ceremonial Pavilion at Sanam Luang Royal Ground

    Bathing Ritual
    Thanksgiving, one of the cultural values behind Songkran festivities, is demonstrated in the ceremonial aspects of Songkran such as the bathing of Buddha statues with lustral water and the pouring of lustral water over elders and respected individuals, and other outward demonstration of respect, conveys this.

    Traditional Thai Art and Cultural Performances
    Look Thoong - Traditional Thai folk music concert
    String quartet
    Musical concerts by youth bands
    Songkran Beauty Pageant
    Songkran Parade
    Dancing fountains
    Temple fair
    Folk Games, sports, contests and competitions
    Traditional Thai art of self-defence/martial arts
    Contemporary sports events
    Traditional Thai stage drama

    CONTEMPORARY MUSICAL & STAGE PERFORMANCES
    April 11 - 15, 2003
    At the Ceremonial Pavilion at Sanam Luang Royal Ground

    LOCAL COMMUNITY SONGRAN FESTIVITIES

    BANGLUMPOO SONGKRAN FESTIVAL
    APRIL 12 - 14, 2003
    At Santichai Prakarn Park and Phra Arthit Road

    Highlights Buddhist merit-making traditions with offerings being made to 9 monks and bathing ritual performed according to ancient Thai traditions

    Procession of the Phra Buddha Sihing and the Phra Buddha Banglumpoo Buddha images

    Stage drama

    Open-air theatre screening Thai movie classics and old-time favourites

    Cultural Street showcasing traditional Thai art and culture

    KHAO SAN SONGKRAN FESTIVAL
    APRIL 12 - 14, 2003
    At Khao San Road

    Highlights Songkran Beauty Pageant

    Fish and Bird Procession

    Musical concert by Suntaraporn

    Variety Shows

    Cultural Street Festivals

    Buddhist merit-making traditions with offerings being made to 9 monks and the building of sand stupas

    RATCHDAMNERN KLANG AVENUE SONGKRAN SHOPPING STREET
    APRIL 12 - 14, 2003
    A shopping opportunity for all things Thai - traditional Thai delicacies and food items, as well as Thai handicrafts and other products.

    BANG PLAD SONGKRAN FESTIVAL
    APRIL 8 - 12, 2003
    AROUND THE RAMA 8 BRIGE
    Highlights A showcase of traditional Thai customs and traditions such as the bathing ritual of Luang Por Sak Kham

    Traditional Thai art and culture including demonstration of Thai dessert making

    Musical performances

    Stalls offering products from the "One Village. OneProduct" promotional campaign

    CHIANG MAI

    Venue : The Wat Phra Singh Voramahaviharn Temple
    and the Tha Phae Gate.

    One of the best places to experience Songkran is in Chiang Mai, where it is celebrated on a grand scale with a flavour uniquely and entirely its own, attracting visitors from far and wide. This year the festivities, scheduled for April 11-15, 2003, are centred around the Wat Phra Singh Voramahaviharn Temple and in the vicinity of the Tha Phae Gate.

    One of the highlights of the festival is the 'Songkran Beauty Queen Procession' which takes place on Songkran Day itself - April 13. Meanwhile, many other events leading up to the main attraction are spread over several days and it is here that the visitor gets to see various aspects of Chiang Mai, first hand, -- its culture, cuisine, arts and crafts, as well as the friendly people.

    April 11-12, 2003
    Drum beating contests
    Venue : Tha Pha Gate plaza
    The drum-beating contest features a wide range of drums used in the olden days for several purposes and on various occasions.

    April 11-15, 2003
    Venue : Wat Phrasingh Voramahaviharn Temple
    Devout Buddhists visit the temple for merit-making and to listen to sermons. As a gesture of reverence, lustral water is poured on monks and sacred Buddha images, and donations are made to the temple. Enjoy traditional Thai cultural performances held within the temple ground.

    April 12-14, 2003
    Venue : Wat Phrasingh Voramahaviharn Temple
    Folk games and entertainment, traditional Thai sports and cultural performances

    April 12-15, 2003
    Venue : Wat Chet Yod Temple
    Enjoy a Northern Cuisine Cooking Contest and shop for souvenirs to take home.

    April 13, 2003
    Venue : The Tha Phae Gate plaza

    HIGHLIGHTS & ACTIVITIES

    April 13 is the actual 'Songkran', or Thai New Year's Day.
    The day begins with merit-making. Food is offered to the monks. The entire area will be transformed into a traditional Lanna Thai market with people dressed in traditional costume.

    Northern delicacies on sale
    Chiang Mai beauties seen riding by on bicycles while skillfully balancing their colourful paper parasols

    The 'Songkran beauty queen' pageant on April 13 & 14
    Displays of martial arts fought with ancient weapons

    Body building contests

    Religious ceremonies
    April 15, 2003
    A procession proceeds along Tha Phae Road on its way to pay respects to the governor of Chiang Mai and seek his blessing. This is traditionally done by pouring lustral water on the respected person's hands, a custom known as 'dum hua'.

    April 16, 2003
    Venue : Wat Ched Yot
    Traditional 'Dum hua' ceremony to pay respects to the elders

    MAI KHAM BHO PROCESSION FESTIVAL
    Amphoe Chom Thong, Chiang Mai
    The Bho Tree is closely associated with the Buddhist religion. Mai Khan Bho which literally means the wooden support for the tree in the temple courtyards are used by the devotees who believe that the support will bring them longevity and prosperity. The Mai Kham Bho wooden support is prepared on April 13 and 14, an activity that is accompanied by cultural performances. On April 15, a procession is held as the Mai Kham Bho is transported to the temples.

    CONTACT INFORMATION:
    TAT NORTHERN OFFICE - REGION 1 (in Chiang Mai)
    E-mail : tatcnx@samart.co.th
    Phone : (053) 248-604, 248-607, 241-466
    Fax : (053) 248-605

    NONG KHAI

    HIGHLIGHTS & ACTIVITIES

    The procession of the Luang Pho Sai Buddha image. This is a long-standing tradition which is still being observed till this day.

    A combined Thai-Lao Songkran Festival

    The "bai sri soo kwan" ceremony to bring good luck and ward off evil

    The sprinkling of lustral water to seek the blessing of elders

    Ecotourism activities

    Walking and running marathons

    Cultural performances and games
    CONTACT INFORMATION :
    TAT NORTHEASTERN OFFICE : REGION 5 (in Udon Thani)
    Phone: (042) 325406-7.

    PHRA PRADAENG

    The Phra Pradaeng Songkran Festival differs from others in that it is held a little later than in most other locales. The Songkran rituals and celebrations here are held on the Sunday that follows after Songkran Day on April 13. Hence in 2003, the festival falls on April 21 - 23.

    Ancient traditions are still being observed and is a source of pride passed on to future generations.

    HIGHLIGHTS & ACTIVITIES

    Thai Raman Flag Ceremony
    Each village makes its own centipede flag which is carried in a ceremonial flag procession along the road to be draped on the swan pillars at various temples. The flag, the symbol of the Thai-Raman people, is of Buddhist significance and incorporates the spirit of unity.

    A demonstration of traditional Raman games such as 'saba', a pitch and toss game played with beans. Various indigenous games of Thai-Raman origin being staged in designated villages from 8.30 p.m. to 12 p.m. during the festival period

    In the Bonsaba, a traditional Raman games, young Raman lads and lasses engage in a lively dialogue, accompanied by song and dance. This is a quaint custom which is now rarely witnessed.

    Raman dances

    A floral float parade

    The 'Songkran Beauty Queen' Procession

    The 'Songkran Beauty Queen' Contest

    The making of "galamae", a famous Phra Pradaeng sweet

    Traditional Thai customs practiced during Songkran
    The pouring of lustral water on to Buddha images, paying respects to elders, and water-splashing

    ORIGINS
    The Phra Pradaeng Songkran Festival was formerly known as the 'Pak Lat Songkran Festival' and was similar to Songkran celebrated in the other regions of the country, with the notable addition of a colourful and elaborate Songkran procession staged by the Mon, or Raman, residents of Phra Pradaeng.

    The highlight of the festival is a grand procession of floral floats carrying beautiful maidens dressed in a traditional Mon, or Raman, costume. Each holds a fish bowl in one hand and a bird cage in the other. Other maidens, accompanied by men dressed in traditional Raman costume of sarong and round-necked shirt and sash (the costume is called "choot loy chai"), walk in front of the 'Songkran beauty queen'. The fish and birds are released as an act of merit to ward off bad luck and bring prosperity.

    Each year the Phra Pradaeng Songkran parade features between 10 to 20 processions. Each procession is made up of a Songkran vehicle decorated with beautiful flowers. The vehicle of the lead procession transports the current Miss Songkran surrounded by her entourage. She is seated and holds a replica of the severed head of the Lord Tao Maha Songkran. The procession also includes a file of beautiful girls dressed in traditional Thai-Raman costumes. Some of them hold a fishbowl, others hold a birdcage and the remainder walk ahead of the Songkran vehicle. They in turn are flanked by Raman youths dressed in Choot Loy Chai costumes, consisting of a sarong, round-necked shirt and scarf which is worn with the tails dangling behind. The men's job is to ensure that everything goes smoothly.

    The procession of the Tao Maha Songkran "head" is a unique aspect of the Phra Padaeng Songkran celebrations. According to ancient beliefs, there was once a kind and benevolent god who cared greatly for mankind. His name was Tao Maha Songkran. He had seven daughters, each one a goddess representing a day of the week. The annual Miss Songkran winner is seen holding the head of Lord Tao Maha Songkran, (also known as Tao Mahapraphrom)- a gesture believed to bring good fortune to mankind.

    Noted for the continued preservation of ancient customs and traditions, the Songkran festival at Phra Pradaeng is no less of an attraction and draws local and overseas tourists alike.

    CONTACT INFORMATION :
    THE PHRA PRADAENG MUNICIPALITY
    Please contact the Education Section
    Phone: 463-4841 Ext. 129-130.

    AYUTTHAYA

    Songkran will be celebrated in Ayutthaya, Thailand's former capital at Viharn Phra Mongkol Bophit and Khum Khun Phaen (Khun Paen's Lodge) from April 13-15, 2003.

    The Songkran or Thai New Year festivities in the ancient capital of Ayutthaya feature the ancient customs and traditions of Songkran that have been observed through the centuries.

    HIGHLIGHTS & ACTIVITIES

    The release of fish and birds and the building of sand stupas and other merit-making activities

    Games and water-splashing.

    A Songkran procession

    Contests
    06:30 - 07:30
    Merit-making activities with offerings being presented to the Buddhist monks on the morning of April 13.

    09:00
    Boat races

    09:30
    Contests
    Miss Songkran Parade

    13:00
    Miss Songkran Procession

    14:00
    The opening ceremony of the Songkran festivities

    The release of fish and birds

    Cultural shows and folk games and entertainment

    Bathing ritual of Buddha images at Wat Phananchoeng and at temples throughout Ayutthaya

    Paying respect to elders
    15:00
    Miss Songkran Contest
    Winners are announced within 18:00

    BANG SAI

    HIGHLIGHTS & ACTIVITIES

    Songkran Traditions

    Kite-fighting contests

    Played and patronised by the kings of Siam for centuries, kite-fighting is a fascinating national sport which highlights the skills and dexterity needed to control the 'pak-pao' or female kite and 'chula', the male kite.

    Traditional Thai sports contests

    Takraw (rattan ball) competition

    Long drum contest

    Glimpses of the Thai Way of Life in the 4 Regions of the Kingdom

    Thai Folk entertainment, games and other leisure activities

    Cultural parade featuring the 4 regions of the Kingdom

    Musical performances and marching bands and a variety of other entertainment

    Display, demonstration and sales of Thai handicraft and other products produced by the SUPPORT Foundation under Royal Patronage

    CONTACT INFORMATION :
    TAT CENTRAL REGION OFFICE : REGION 6 (in Ayutthaya)
    Phone: (035) 246076-7

    THE BANG SAI ROYAL FOLK ART & CRAFTS CENTRE
    Tel: In Bangkok : (66 2) 225 - 8165 to 68 Ext. 460
    Tel: In Ayutthaya : (035) 366 - 092

    NAKHON SI THAMMARAT

    In this Southern province, Songkran festivities will be held in the area in front of the Provincial Hall and at the Somdet Phra Srinakarin Park (Tung Tha Lat) on April 13-16, 2003.

    Nakhon Si Thammarat has been a centre for Buddhism and culture in Southern Thailand since ancient times. The province is dotted with many architectural treasures, some centuries old, a testament to its long history. The main wat or temple is the Phra Boromathat Nakhon Si Thammarat houses the presiding Buddha image known as the Phra Buddha Singh. For hundreds of years, it has been the tradition to pour lustral water onto this image during the fifth month of the Thai calendar. The present day Songkran Festival has evolved from this practice.

    ACTIVITIES

    Merit-making activities include making offerings to 200 monks in front of the Provincial Hall

    A procession escorting the Phra Singh Buddha image from the Provincial Hall to Tung Tha Lat; the Phra Singh Buddha image is bathed with lustral waters. Respect is paid to the elders by offering lustral waters.

    Cultural performances and games
    CONTACT INFORMATION :
    TAT SOUTHERN OFFICE : REGION 2 (in Nakhon Si Thammarat)
    Phone: (075) 346515-6.

    SONGKHLA

    At Hat Yai Municipal Public Park, Amphoe Hat Yai and Thai Pavilion, Samila Beach, Amphoe Muang

    EVENT HIGHLIGHTS

    Miss Songkran pageant and Miss Songkran procession
    Fire fountain shows and cultural performances
    Contests of local chickens, roosters, Krong Hua Chuk birds, zebra dove cooing, cow-fighting, and bodybuilding
    Mountain biking, tennis and beach volleyball competitions
    In Songkhla, a large town in Southern Thailand, Songkran celebrations will be held at various venues over the April 6-16, 2003 period.

    April 6-13, 2003
    Venue : The Municipal Park, Hat Yai

    Cultural performances
    April 13-15, 2003
    Venue : The Sanehanusorn and Nipat Uthit 3 Roads

    Contact information:
    TAT SOUTHERN OFFICE : REGION 1 (in Hat Yai)
    Phone: (074) 243747, 238518

    HAT YAI MUNICIPALITY
    Tel: (074) 244777, 233277, 243050
    Fax: (074) 235533

    SONGKHLA MUNICIPALITY
    Tel: (074) 311387, 311015, 311833
    Fax: (074) 328872

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    6,015
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 156 Times in 110 Posts
    AN INTRODUCTION TO SONGKRAN

    "Songkran" is a word from the Sanskrit language which means to "move into" and refers to the orbit of the sun moving into Aries. It marks the end of a 12-month cycle and the beginning of a new solar year. Songkran is therefore the Thai New Year celebrations.

    This traditional Thai custom of merry-making is the Kingdom's most 'sanuk' (fun-filled) festival, celebrated with tremendous enthusiasm, nation-wide, once a year. In most parts of the country, Songkran extends over a period of 3 days.

    Known the world-over for its characteristic tradition of water-throwing ranging from a courteous sprinkle or a polite splash, to harmless water pistols and showers from garden hoses to the well-aimed bucket or water-cannon . delivered in a festive spirit. Without a doubt, on the practical side, Songkran is a refreshing solution to "beating the heat" in the hottest season of the year. There is a however a much deeper significance to "Songkran".

    Apart from marking a new beginning, Songkran is also a time for thanksgiving. It is an important time for individuals to reflect upon the many acts of kindness and thoughtfulness each has personally experienced and to remember how such acts of generosity and compassion bring peace, happiness and well-being. Songkran is also the time for reunions and family ties are renewed.

    At the heart of each Thai custom and tradition, there is always a logical reason for its existence. The festive elements of the celebration, the cultural values, the social code of conduct and individual belief and practices are intertwined. Songkran embodies the traditional Thai cultural values.

    The underlying significance of Songkran is the process of cleansing and purification - the purging of all ills, misfortune and evil and starting the New Year afresh with all that is good and pure. Water is symbolic of the cleaning process and signifies purity

    THE CULTURAL VALUES BEHIND SONGKRAN

    The Cultural Values of the Songkran Festival are expressed through the various ceremonies and rituals. The meaningful aspects of Songkran are varied and culturally rich.
    The first Cultural Value is "Thanksgiving" - The demonstration of gratitude and an expression of thanks to individuals who have have "done good" or shown goodwill and are worthy of respect and recognition.

    Thanksgiving is demonstrated in Ceremonial aspects of Songkran such as the bathing of Buddha statues with lustral water, and the pouring of lustral water over elders and respected individuals conveys this and other outward demonstration of respect.

    The Second Cultural Value is Loyalty to Ancestors. This is achieved through merit-making.

    The Third Cultural Value focuses on the an individual's sense of awareness of his/her responsibilities towards the family and home. It is demonstrated via the traditional custom of "spring cleaning".

    The Fourth Value addresses the Value of Religion and highlights the well- defined roles and responsibilities of the "temples and monasteries" on the one hand and the community served by the religious institution.

    Observance of this principle involves :
    Community involvement in the spring-cleaning of temples Meritmaking and offering food and alms to monks The bathing of Buddha statues and monks The construction of "chedis" or stupas and the decoration or beautification of temple surroundings

    The Fifth Value is "Acts of kindness and generosity" towards others or Doing good for others".

    Demonstrated by the preparation, exchange and sharing of food and desserts by members of the community and the sprinkling of water on each other. This is a gesture of hospitality shown as individuals attempt to "cool" each other off in the intense summer heat.

    The Sixth Value is the Spirit of Co-Operation and Community Spirit demonstrated through the enthusiastic participation of individuals of demonstrated through the enthusiastic participation of individuals of the community in Songkran festivities, sharing in the fun, spreading happiness and goodwill to all.

    The morning of Songkran Day begins with merit-making according to local customs and traditions. Younger folks make their way to show their respect and seek the blessings of elders and individuals of seniority by making offerings. The ritual which accompanies this show of respect is highly elaborate. Deep respect and reverence is shown to the highest institution of the Kingdom - the monarchy and members of the royal family, learned individuals in particular those who are "teachers" the providers of knowledge to students and elders recognised for their worldly experience and wisdom.

    This gesture of respect manifests itself in the form of a colourful and vibrant procession. This is Songkran and not a moment's "sanuk" is to be missed. Bright colours, song and dance and festive fun is the order of the day.

    Once the ceremonial gesture of respect has been shown and the good-spirited water-throwing is over, everyone returns home to "freshen up" and prepare for the evening's celebrations which consists of various performances and forms of entertainment. Not to be missed is the "Ram Wong" Thai folk dance. The "Ram Wong" enables everyone to join in the fun.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    6,015
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 156 Times in 110 Posts
    THE SIGNIFICANCE OF SONGKRAN:
    ORIGINS OF THE FESTIVAL
    & THE CULTURAL VALUES BEHIND SONGKRAN

    Songkran Day has been celebrated as New Year's Day in the Thai solar calendar since ancient times. The date coincides with the day the sun leaves Pisces and enters Aries, usually falling on April 13 of each year.

    The word "Songkran" means a passage or course and refers to the position of the sun within the solar system. As the sun enters each of the houses of the zodiac constellation, a songkran cycle is completed. Over time, the use of the term has become more generic and Songkran is more commonly associated with the period when the sun enters Aries, in April. During this time, the sun is equidistant to the earth so there are an equal number of hours during the day and night, a phenomenon known as "mahasongkran" (the supreme cycle). This marks the beginning of the Thai new year.

    Songkran is celebrated over a 3-day period.

    APRIL 13 - WAN SANGKHAN LHONG
    "Sangkarn Lhong day" marks the end of an era. Various activities are undertaken to "send off" the outgoing year. In the morning, merit-making rituals are performed and offerings are made to the Buddhist monks. Spring-cleaning and personal cleansing are also part of this "renewal" process. Later in the day, Buddha images are bathed with lustral water in a gesture of respect. The religious ceremonies include a procession of Buddha images through the city streets offering an opportunity for residents of the community to take part in the bathing rites. An annual "Miss Songkran" parade and floral floats are part of the popular festivities held to greet the Thai new year.

    APRIL 14 - WAN NAO OR WAN DA
    On April 14, the position of the sun is mid-way between Pisces and Aries. "Wan nao" or "Wan da" is a day of preparation as family members gather to help prepare offerings for the monks for the next morning. The afternoon is spent carrying sand into the 'wats' or temples. This is considered to be an auspicious day when everyone sports a happy face and avoids uttering words deemed inauspicious or bad-tempered. Merit-making continues in the morning with offerings being made to Buddhist monks. The world-famous Songkran water-splashing festive fun takes place all day helping revellers to beat the summer heat. In the evening, sand is brought to the temples for the building of sand stupas which are then decorated with colourful flags and flowers. The practice reflects an ancient belief that when an individuals walks away from a temple, particles of sand from the temple grounds are inadvertently carried away on one's shoes or sandals. The building of sand stupas for the temple is seen to be a practical way of replacing the sand lost and a merit-making act through which blessings are earned.

    APRIL 15 - WAN PHYA WAN
    April 15 marks the Thai New Year. This is the most important day of the Songkran New Year celebrations. It is a day traditionally spent making merit and performing charitable acts such as presenting offerings to the monks and listening to sermons, sprinkling holy water on Buddha images and monks, propping up the sacred Bo tree in the temple grounds, and calling on elders to receive their blessings.

    A bathing ritual is observed in which lustral water is poured over respected elders in a gesture of respect and reverence. The seeking of their blessing or forgiveness for past wrong-doing is also implied. Additionally it is believed that through these acts of merit-making, loved ones, long-departed are endowed with blessings and good fortune. Last but not least comes the water-splashing ceremony and other festivities which is the most fun-filled part of the celebrations.

    The religious ceremonies and folk rituals associated with Songkran are principally performed to bring good luck and prosperity. The rituals are also acts of gratitude and indebtedness undertaken in the memory of those who have passed on to another world.

    The Songkran activities that take place in various locations around the kingdom are culturally unique and reflect local beliefs and practices. Each offers varying elements of interest.

  4. #4
    xilver Guest
    Hi

    I understand that there are a set number of days and dates that the splashing of water is allowed. Some places officially can do it for weeks while some other places for a day only.

    I wonder if anyone has any info on this as I understand like in Hatyai, it is for 1 day only and the dates for people in Pataya is much later... Right?

    Cheers
    Xilver

  5. #5
    Geoff Freeman-Smith Guest
    I am travelling to Khorat on 6th April. I have a Thai wife and we are returning to her parents house to introduce our new baby (6 months ) to the new proud grandparents. We intend to have a nice time and get very wet no doubt. The parents have never met our baby yet

  6. #6
    Geoff Freeman-Smith Guest
    Thank you for the information about Songkran. Will be in Thailand from 07/04/03 to 29/04/03 enjoying the "sanuk"

  7. #7
    Guest

    sad

    Does anyone want to tell me what to watch out for while in Thailand during Songkran. This year will be the first year I have visited during the "New Year" and I have heard some horror stories about what can happen to you.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Thailand is my home.
    Posts
    1,439
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Gor Gai

    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]Does anyone want to tell me what to watch out for while in Thailand during Songkran.
    Water. You can get wet!

    Oh, and a dangerous overdose of fun!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    ˹ѡ
    Posts
    1,697
    Thanks
    10
    Thanked 20 Times in 13 Posts
    ...and (in Bangkok at least) to get completely covered in white powder. This was supposedly banned last year, but there was still masses of it about.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Thailand is my home.
    Posts
    1,439
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Huh? White powder? What for? I never heard about this before...

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •