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Understanding textspeak in Thai
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  1. #1
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    Understanding textspeak in Thai

    Just recently, I get to know that many Thais like to use textspeak in social media comments and text messages.

    Like for instance I was told ¹ is short for who is ().

    Is there a comprehensive site that list the common textspeak used by them?

    Thank you.

  2. #2
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    Re: Understanding textspeak in Thai

    If you plug this term "" (chat language) into Google, you'll get some pages off different thai language only forums (DekD, Kapook, etc) which list some common chat-speak thai.

    Originally chat speak in thai was designed to facilitate typing faster on a p/c's keyboard without using the shift key. Now with the mobile sms, line, what's app craze it's gotten even further off base! Some words unless someone tells you what the original word was you'd have a tough time guessing the meaning.

    When chat speak thai first came out the "Ministry of Silly Walks" (or some other official ministry here) did a mass marketing campaign lamenting the fact that thai was being corrupted and called it Ժѵ. Thankfully the thai youth of today took no notice to what was being said and now you're seeing an increase in this 'version of thai"..

    I think like all things kidz do, once they hit adulthood they'll start acting like grownups and leave the cutesy chat speak behind...

    Try googling the term I suggested and read some of the posts...

    One thing I will mention.

    Forums relating to the thai language are over-flowing with foreigners asking for this or that translation in thai. Most of these are posts by their thai significant others chats or communication off social networking sites and ask for translation in english. A lot are just mundane day to day stuff, but some are more extensive. I fooled with doin' it for a while. However, because thai is so context specific AND that a lot of the words are misspelled in chat speak, it's really tough to suss out what's what.

    Good Luck. . .

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    Re: Understanding textspeak in Thai

    In chatspeak, the word some people type Thai goes against the correct spellings. Besides the use of slang or pasa talaad, as long as the words sound similar to the actual Thai words, the receiver will understand. E.g. can be typed as . Other times, the word can be determined from the context although it is spelled incorrectly. E.g. ͡Ź; 仡͹
    Last edited by yeows; 13-02-15 at 11:26 PM.

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    Re: Understanding textspeak in Thai

    Quote Originally Posted by yeows View Post
    In chatspeak, the word some people type Thai goes against the correct spellings. Besides the use of slang or pasa talaad, as long as the words sound similar to the actual Thai words, the receiver will understand. E.g. can be typed as . Other times, the word can be determined from the context although it is spelled incorrectly. E.g. ͡Ź; 仡͹
    In that sense it's very much like texting in English. For example, "Where are you" is typed as 'Wer r u", "could" is "cud", "home" is "hom", "phone" is "fon", etc. It's more based on the sound and defies correct spelling--which is quite bad for beginning learners of the language! (I confess I do this too with close friends, LOL, when concerned with space constraint.)
    ___
    Edit: Sorry, I have quoted your unedited post.

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    Re: Understanding textspeak in Thai

    Only text talk i've come across is a Thai version of LOL..

    555 meaning ha ha ha

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    Marie (14-03-15)

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    Re: Understanding textspeak in Thai

    When Thai say...My friend you...they are asking, is that your friend......where as, when they say...your friend me....they are telling you, that is their friend...

    Pretty easy really...
    The best time to plant a tree was 20 years ago. The second best time is now.
    - Chinese Proverb

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    Re: Understanding textspeak in Thai

    Fileeep;
    Are you sure "my friend you"- means a thai is asking if that's your friend? I always took it to me the statement "your friend"... Now I personally have never heard "your friend me"..

    The mix up comes from the possessive form of things in thai being like this;
    ͹ͧ - my friend and ͹ͧس - your friend. Thaiz are taught that the possessive is "my" then the noun "friend", BUT no one tells them NOT to use the personal pronoun "me" in constructs like that which is why you get "my friend me" for "my friend".

    my sister me ͧǢͧѹ - my sister.
    my mother me ͧѹ - my mother

    This is a very common mistake made by rank-n-file thaiz when they speak engrish and it takes a while for them to dial into how to really say it.

    To comment on "yeows" statement the question tag word in thai is now spelled as in newpapers, magazines, advertising almost all the time because it better mimics how the word is really pronounced in real life with a high tone NOT a rising one like it's spelled.

    As I said, thai has undergone exponential changes since thaiz started routinely using social media (much to the chagrin of the "powerz-that-be"). If I had to guess, I'd say the language has changed more in the last 10 years than it had during the previous 100!

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