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Fox News announces candidate line-up for prime-time debate - Page 30
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  1. #291
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    Re: Fox News announces candidate line-up for prime-time debate

    Quote Originally Posted by Curt View Post
    The assumption is that Trump is a racist. Has anyone read, lately, that Trump once sued his country club because they wouldn't allow blacks and jews as members. Apparently frustrated by the legal process, he decided to buy it for 10 million and open it to everyone.

    I guess Rocky missed that story!
    Wonder how high the price would have been without the litigation. Sorry. Find it hard to imagine the words "Trump" and "egalitarian" appearing together in the same sentence without the word "not" or "never"!

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    Re: Fox News announces candidate line-up for prime-time debate

    About Us
    The purpose of Amish PAC's Plain Voter Project is to beat Hillary Clinton in 2016 by turning out a deeply conservative and often forgotten block of voters concentrated in two key swing states - the Amish.

    Amish PAC has no use for internet and television advertising because the voters we're targeting don't use the internet or watch television. Therefore, Amish PAC's ad blitz is two-pronged: Newspapers and Billboards. In addition, Amish PAC is building a large network of volunteers across Amish Country to assist in voter registration and flyer distribution.


    A breakdown of our Amish newspaper ad campaign:
    Goal: Introduce Amish voters to the presumptive GOP nominee, Donald Trump.
    Areas targeted: Ohio and Pennsylvania (primarily Lancaster County in PA & Holmes County in OH)
    Size of ad: 3/8 page
    Newspapers: The Budget & Holmes County Shopper
    Frequency: Weekly starting 7/9/2016.

    A breakdown of our billboard ad campaign:
    Goal: Remind potential Amish and Mennonite voters that the last day for registering to vote in Oct. 11.
    Areas Targeted: Lancaster County
    Billboard locations: Ephrata, PA and Quarryville, PA
    Timeline: Billboards launched 7/25. They will run up until Oct. 11. Then replaced with new messaging.

    Contributions are not deductible as charitable contributions for federal income tax purposes.
    Paid for by AMISH PAC. Not authorized by any candidate or candidate's committee.

    AMISH PAC
    3118 Washington Blvd. Unit #100306
    Arlington, VA 22210

    Privacy Policy

    Read the full article and see photos here: Contributions are not deductible as charitable contributions for federal income tax purposes.
    Paid for by AMISH PAC. Not authorized by any candidate or candidate's committee.

    AMISH PAC
    3118 Washington Blvd. Unit #100306
    Arlington, VA 22210

    Privacy Policy

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    Re: Fox News announces candidate line-up for prime-time debate

    Will the Amish vote for Donald Trump? Don't bet the farm: Kyle C. Kopko

    the farm: Kyle C. Kopko



    1 / 97
    Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump campaigns at Cumberland Valley High School in Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania on Monday August 1, 2016. Daniel Zampogna, PennLive
    Daniel Zampogna | dzampogna@pennlive.com
    Print Email PennLive Op-Ed By PennLive Op-Ed
    on August 12, 2016 at 1:00 PM, updated August 12, 2016 at 1:02 PM
    By Kyle C. Kopko

    Supporters of Donald Trump's campaign have recently employed an unorthodox tactic to secure additional votes in Pennsylvania and Ohio – forming a super PAC to mobilize Amish voters.

    KYLE C. KOPKO HEADSHOT ART.jpg
    Kyle C. Kopko (PennLive File Photo)

    The aptly named Amish PAC has already purchased billboard and newspaper advertisements in in an effort to appeal to Amish voters.

    But will the Amish vote for Trump in 2016? My research with Donald Kraybill provides some guidance on this question.

    There are a number of factors working against the Amish supporting Trump, or any presidential candidate for that matter. First, the Amish typically refrain from political participation – including voting – because of their religious beliefs. The Amish maintain a level of separation from the outside world to ensure spiritual purity.

    Further complicating outreach to potential Amish voters is the role of the president as commander-in-chief. The Amish reject violence and war. The fact that the president controls the armed forces reduces the chances that they would participate in a presidential election.

    That's not to say that Amish never vote. The degree to which voting is accepted varies by church district and community. There is anecdotal evidence of Amish voting in local elections, particularly when ordinances or zoning issues directly influence their way of life. But, by and large, Amish going to the polls is the exception, not the rule.

    Trump to appeal to Reagan Democrats affected by the collapse of the manufacturing industry.
    Perhaps the most prominent exception was the 2004 presidential election.

    At the time, Pennsylvania was considered a battleground state, and in the event of another cliffhanger election like in 2000, Pennsylvania's 21 electoral votes could have decided the election's outcome.

    Republican operatives sought to register new voters who would support George W. Bush's socially conservative policies. Turning out a few thousand new voters from an untapped demographic group could swing the Keystone State in the event of another close election.

    Read full article and comments, photos, here:
    http://www.pennlive.com/opinion/2016..._trump_29.html

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    Re: Fox News announces candidate line-up for prime-time debate

    I talked with a Jehovahs Witness lady yesterday who told me they do not vote either, nor do they usually discuss it among themselves.

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    Re: Fox News announces candidate line-up for prime-time debate

    Tomorrow's news: Trump targets the Mexican American vote!

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    Re: Fox News announces candidate line-up for prime-time debate

    The ones I know don't care much for him. However, according to the owner of the flea market where I have my weekend business, he has talked with several who like Mr. Trump and have purchased the Trump license plates he has been selling. I think they may be playing a joke on someone, but I'm probably wrong. Again.

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    Re: Fox News announces candidate line-up for prime-time debate

    By CHRISTINA CAPATIDES CBS NEWS June 1, 2016, 6:31 PM
    Meet the Mexican-Americans who agree with Trump on immigration

    During the lead up to the 2016 election, much emphasis has been placed on the growing number of Latino voters, their presumed distaste for Donald Trump and what that might mean for the Republican party.

    Meet some of Donald Trump's Latino supporters
    Play VIDEO
    Meet some of Donald Trump's Latino supporters
    Most people who have heard the real estate mogul's controversial campaign rhetoric or visited his fiery Twitter feed simply assume that the Latino voting block has been deeply offended and opposes Trump's tough stance on immigration. And while that may be true of the majority of Latino voters, the group is not a monolith -- there is a vocal minority of Mexican-Americans along the U.S. border who passionately agree with Trump.

    Take, for example, Tony Castañeda -- a third generation Mexican-American and former police chief in Eagle Pass, Texas -- who is vehemently against full amnesty for illegal immigrants.

    "A lot of my relatives are still waiting in line on the Mexican side... They're paying their fees. They're submitting their paperwork. They're waiting their period of time," Castañeda explains. "Relatives of mine have been on the line for 15 years, trying to get across, trying to get their status. And some people just come in the middle of the night, and then want to live and hide and benefit from a lot of things we have in this country, taking it away from American citizens."

    Miriam Cepeda, a Mexican-American graduate student studying history at the University of Texas-Rio Grande Valley, agrees.

    "In the late '50s, my father, my grandfather and my grandmother, they came to America," Cepeda explains. "My grandfather applied for a resident citizenship here, and since then, they've used the opportunities available to them here in America, and have advanced in whatever path life has led them. But they did it legally. They did it legally."

    In the CBSN Originals documentary, "Neustro Amigo: Latinos for Trump," CBS News correspondent Elaine Quijano sits down with a handful of Mexican-Americans in Texas border towns who echo this sentiment that that they have played by the rules, so others should be made to as well.

    Frank Santos -- a first generation Mexican-American who came to the U.S. legally in childhood -- tells Quijano that he doesn't "believe in [immigrating] illegally or anything like that."

    Santos lived here for three decades before deciding to become a citizen in 2012 so he could vote. "People that are here illegal, I have compassion for them if they are here five years. After five years, if you haven't done [anything] to try to be here legally, you're never gonna do it," he said.

    And for many Mexican-Americans who feel they've followed the rules and achieved the American dream the "right way," that is simply unacceptable.

    "I have a Social Security card. You have a Social Security card," Castañeda said, as he stood on a bluff overlooking the U.S.-Mexico border. "I have to pay IRS taxes when I'm due, and these people are not paying any of those. They are taking advantage of several programs that are out there, so there has to be some type of control because it's bleeding us. it's bleeding us left and right. And, I mean, we can't go into Mexico and live there forever. They have their own rules, their own laws that people need to comply with. And we would like for their folks to also comply with ours."

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    Re: Fox News announces candidate line-up for prime-time debate

    Differences Between Latino, Chicano and Hispanic American

    Hispanic

    Often the term "Hispanic" is used synonymously with the word "Latino", and frequently with "Latin" as well. Even though the terms may sometimes overlap in meaning, they are not completely synonymous.

    "Hispanic" specifically refers to Spain, and to the Spanish-speaking nations of the Americas, as cultural and demographic extensions of Spain. It should be further noted that in a U.S. context, a Hispanic population consists of the people of Spain and everyone with origins in any of Spanish-speaking nations of the Americas, regardless of ancestry of the latter. In the context of Spain and Latin America, a Hispanic population consists of the people of Spain, and when regarding the inhabitants of the Spanish-speaking nations of the Americas, includes only criollos, mestizos, mulattos, and others with Spanish ancestry, to the exclusion of indigenous Amerindians, unmixed descendants of black Africans and whites or other peoples from later migrations without any Spanish lineage.

    Latino

    The Spanish term Latino (for males) or (Latina for females) actually translates into "a Latin person",

    1) Latins - a member of one of the Latin peoples; specifically : a native or inhabitant of Latin America

    2) Latin - of or relating to the peoples or countries using Romance languages; specifically : of or relating to the peoples or countries of Latin America.

    Latinos are speakers of romance languages (Spanish) and by definition are Latins. The Spanish word 'Latino' became more common and was used for 'political correctness', not to give the impression that Latinos were not Latin, but because most people of Latin America referred to themselves as 'latinos, using their native Spanish language. The terms Latin and Latino are used interchangeably to describe Latinos and their culture, i.e. Latin Jazz, Latin music, The Latin Grammies is an event being held in New York City this year, (2006) in which other "Latins" including Brazilians and Spaniards will participate in.

    Complications arise when some try to assign different meanings than what the term latino ("a Latin person of the male form)means. Therefore it is better to refer to Latinos (which means 'a latin person', in Spanish) as Latins (the English word for latino) to avoid excluding other latin people who may be offended by using a term that is in another latin peoples language. This also avoids confusion and the offense of giving the impression that there is a difference between being latino and being latin.
    Chicano

    The origin of the word has been explained in various ways. According to the Mexican researcher on patterns of emigration to the United States Manuel Gamio, "chicamo" (with an "m") was first used as a derogatory term for recently-arrived Mexican immigrants by Mexican-American Texans at the beginning of the 20th century. In California, a similar explanation dating to the 1930s and 1940s is proposed: "the inability of native Nahuatl speakers from Morelos state to refer to themselves as 'Mexicanos,' and instead spoke of themselves as 'Mesheecanos,' in accordance with the pronunciation rules of their language". This pronunciation was similarly met with derision by settled Mexican Americans, who exaggerated the sound to mock the recently-arrived. In both cases, the term and its pronunciation are analogous to the Nahuatl word "Mexica".

    An alternate etymology holds that the conversion of the pronunciation of the "x" in "Mexicano" was converted the /sh/ or /ch/ as either a term of endearment or of derisiveness.

    "Chicamo" eventually became "chicano", which, unlike "chicamo", reflects the grammatical conventions of Spanish-language ethno- and demonyms.

    The term was taken up in the mid 1960s by Mexican American activists, who, in attempt to rid the word of its negative connotation and create a unique ethnic identity, reconfigured its meaning by proudly identifying themselves as "Chicanos".

    At certain points in the 1970s, "chicano" was the preferred, politically correct term to use in reference to Mexican-Americans, particularly in the scholarly literature from the field of sociology. However, as the term became politicized, its use fell out of favor as a means of referring to the entire population. Since then, "chicano" has tended to refer to politicized Mexican-Americans.

    Some Mexican Americans prefer to identify themselves as American, Hispanic, Hispanic American, Hispano or Hispana, Latino or Latina, Mexican American, Mexican, Spanish American, Spanish, or Tejano/Tejana. The reasons for rejecting the term "Chicano" are numerous and varied, from an aversion to its association with the left-wing politics of the 1960 and 1970s, to the ability of many families, particularly in the state of New Mexico, to trace their ancestry back to the original Spanish settlers of the colonial era.

    Many Chicanos interchangeably use the term la raza (literally, the indiginous race) to define themselves. Some use the phrase la raza de bronce ("the bronze race") seeing themselves as "brown" or "bronze" because of their Indigenous ancestry (as opposed to white and black people). Using another term common in early twentieth-century americanista/indigenist thought, some also refer to themselves as "la raza c�smica", which means "the cosmic race."

    Due to the gendered nature of Spanish language, some activists and writers who do not find the masculine term Chicano acceptable to use as a plural, use the terms "Chicano/a" or "Chican@."

    Many individuals of Mexican descent view the use of the words Chicano or Chicana as reclamation and regeneration of an indigenous culture destroyed through colonialism, although these are only opinions and may not reflect the view of all Chicanos. Some younger Mexican Americans refer to themselves as Xicanos with an "X" to appear even more radical in terms of political ideology.

    Source: Wikipedia.org
    http://www.thehispanicamerican.com/l...c-american-02/

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    Re: Fox News announces candidate line-up for prime-time debate

    Hope the above article is clear enough!

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    Re: Fox News announces candidate line-up for prime-time debate

    Donald Trump, in Shake-Up, Hires Breitbart Executive for Top Campaign Post
    By ASHLEY PARKER and MAGGIE HABERMANAUG. 17, 2016

    LAS VEGAS — Donald J. Trump has shaken up his presidential campaign for the second time in two months, hiring a top executive from the conservative website Breitbart News and promoting a senior adviser in an effort to right his faltering campaign.

    Stephen Bannon, the executive chairman of Breitbart News LLC, will become the Republican campaign’s chief executive, and Kellyanne Conway, a senior adviser and pollster for Mr. Trump and his running mate, Gov. Mike Pence of Indiana, will become the campaign manager.

    Paul Manafort, the campaign chairman, will retain his title. But the staffing change, hammered out on Sunday and set to be formally announced Wednesday morning, was seen by some as a demotion for Mr. Manafort.

    The news, first reported by The Wall Street Journal, was confirmed early Wednesday by Ms. Conway in a brief interview, but she rejected the idea that the changes amounted to a shake-up and said that Mr. Manafort was not being diminished.

    “It’s an expansion at a busy time in the final stretch of the campaign,” she said, adding that Mr. Manafort and his deputy, Rick Gates, would remain in their roles.

    “We met as the ‘core four’ today,” Ms. Conway added, referring to herself, Mr. Bannon, Mr. Manafort and Mr. Gates.

    People briefed on the move said that it reflected Mr. Trump’s realization that his campaign was at a crisis point. But it indicates that the candidate — who has chafed at making the types of changes his current aides have asked for, even though he had acknowledged they would need to occur — has decided to embrace his aggressive style for the duration of the race.

    Both Ms. Conway and Mr. Bannon, whose news organization has been very favorable to Mr. Trump since he entered the primaries, are close with Robert and Rebekah Mercer, the father-and-daughter conservative donors who have become allies of the candidate and are funding a “super PAC” that is working against Hillary Clinton.

    Ms. Conway has past presidential experience in primary races, but the role in a general election represents a new one for her. She is well liked by Mr. Trump’s daughter Ivanka and her husband, Jared Kushner, who had been serving as the de facto campaign manager.

    Mr. Bannon has no experience with political campaigns, but he represents the type of bare-knuckled fighter that the candidate had in Corey Lewandowski, his combative former campaign manager, who was fired on June 20.

    Mr. Bannon has been a supporter of Mr. Trump’s pugilistic instincts, which the candidate has made clear in interviews he is uncertain about suppressing. He is also deeply mistrustful of the political establishment, and his website has often been critical of Speaker Paul D. Ryan and Senator Mitch McConnell, the majority leader.

    Rudolph W. Giuliani, the former mayor of New York City who has become a close Trump adviser, has also urged the candidate to dig in and prepare to fight harder, and in a more focused way, in what has quickly become one of the nastiest presidential campaigns in modern United States history.

    Mr. Manafort, who had initially been hired to steer Mr. Trump through what appeared to be a protracted fight for delegates, rose in power after repeated clashes with Mr. Lewandowski.

    Mr. Lewandowski was ultimately fired with the help of Mr. Trump’s adult children, who believed the campaign manager was trying to spread negative stories about Mr. Kushner.

    Read the full article here: http://www.nytimes.com/2016/08/18/us...fort.html?_r=0

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