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    Re: Fox News announces candidate line-up for prime-time debate

    Fact Checker Fact checking the fifth round of GOP debates


    Fact Checker
    Fact checking the fifth round of GOP debates
    Resize Text Print Article Comments 49

    By Glenn Kessler and Michelle Ye Hee Lee December 16 at 12:08 AM
    Play Video1:57War, terrorism dominate GOP debate

    Here are highlights from CNN's Republican presidential debate on Dec. 15 in less than two minutes. (Sarah Parnass/The Washington Post)
    CNN aired two GOP presidential debates on Dec. 15: a prime-time event starring nine candidates and an earlier debate featuring four second-tier contenders, based on an average of recent polls.

    Not every candidate uttered statements that are easily fact checked, but following is a list of 12 suspicious or interesting claims. As is our practice, we do not award Pinocchios when we do a roundup of facts in debates.

    See full article and video here:
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/...f-gop-debates/

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    Re: Fox News announces candidate line-up for prime-time debate

    Cruz, Rubio battle while Trump pledges GOP loyalty at debate

    Las Vegas (CNN)The simmering rivalry between Marco Rubio and Ted Cruz spilled into the open Tuesday night during the final Republican presidential debate of the year, as the two senators tussled over a string of issues that served to highlight front-runner Donald Trump's discomfort with policy substance.

    CNN's two-hour prime-time event here was dominated by national security and terrorism in the aftermath of the deadly terrorist attacks in Paris and San Bernardino, California.

    Full article and video here:

    http://www.cnn.com/2015/12/15/politi...ebate-updates/

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    Re: Fox News announces candidate line-up for prime-time debate

    7 Moments That Mattered at the 5th Republican Undercard Presidential Debate

    Four presidential candidates whose combined national polling numbers are in the low single digits, gathered on a debate stage in Las Vegas on Tuesday night with seemingly little hope of breaking into the top tier as the first nominating contests of 2016 approach.

    Fielding questions from CNN moderator Wolf Blitzer, each of the Republican contenders sought to convince voters, for the last time this year, that they deserve another look.

    Former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee, who was lucky enough to make the main stage debate for the first three GOP debates, was given the boot again to what has been called the “kids table” debate, joining three other low-polling regulars: South Carolina Sen. Lindsey Graham, former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum, and former New York Gov. George Pataki.

    Here’s a look at 7 moments that mattered at the final “undercard” debate of 2015:

    Candidates pile on Donald Trump

    Graham sharply rebuked the Republican frontrunner early in the debate for his controversial proposal to ban Muslims from entering the United States.

    “Donald Trump has done the one single thing you cannot do: Declare war on Islam itself. ISIL would be dancing in the streets, they just don't believe in dancing,” Graham said. “This is a coup for them and to all of our Muslim friends throughout the world.”

    Pataki joined in Graham’s criticism: “To target a religion and say that regardless of whether you're an American soldier who has fought on our side our allies we have overseas simply because of your religion we'll ban you is un-American. It is unconstitutional and it is wrong.”

    Santorum called Trump’s idea “not the right proposal” and Huckabee referred to the proposed ban as “impractical.”

    And a few defend him too

    For all the candidates’ criticism of Trump, his GOP rivals Huckabee and Santorum said he started an important conversation.

    “He brings up a very important issue that I think we've been ignoring for far too long,” Santorum said. “The reality is that, yes, we need to get reformist Muslims to join us.”

    Huckabee agreed, arguing Trump’s plan is impractical but acknowledged he “has touched a nerve because people are angry and afraid that we are facing an enemy that this administration refuses to acknowledge, refuses to want to go fight.”

    Rick Santorum: ‘Islam is different’

    Responding to a question asked earlier of several other candidates -- whether surveillance of American Muslims violate their First Amendment rights -- Santorum offered a forceful take.

    “The fact of the matter is, Islam is different,” Santorum said. “I know this is going to come as a shock to a lot of people. I mean that sincerely. Islam is not just a religion. It is a political governing structure.”

    Graham on Muslim-Americans: ‘You are not the enemy’

    Shortly after Santorum’s comments, Graham underscored the importance of not targeting the Muslim community.

    “There are at least 3,500 American-Muslims serving in the armed forces. Thank you for your service. You are not the enemy. Your religion is not the enemy,” Graham fired back. To demonstrate his point, the South Carolina senator shared a personal experience he had while in Afghanistan for its second presidential election with a Muslim-American U.S. Army sergeant.

    “We went back to his high school where they were doing polling -- people voting,” Graham said of the sergeant, who he explained had left Kabul after high school then joined the U.S. Army.

    “He took me there and cried like a baby. I cried like a baby. He is the solution to this problem, folks. He is not the problem,” Graham said. “Leave the faith alone. Go after the radicals that kill us all.”

    Santorum and Pataki spar on women in combat

    When asked about whether or not he supported the Pentagon’s opening of all U.S. military combat roles to women, Santorum said he would reverse the policy change.

    “I would use the studies that were done that were ignored by this military, that [said] there were certain positions that frankly were not suitable [for women].”

    Pataki challenged his fellow Republicans' stances, saying that women have the right to an opportunity to prove their ability to carry out roles they were previously excluded from.

    “I don't care if you're a man or a woman, I care if you're good and capable of doing the job. If you can do the job, don't lower standards, don't lower the criteria,” Pataki said.

    Santorum sought to clarify: “What you said is you agree with me. Because that's exactly what I said. I said if you can't do the job, you shouldn't be able to have the position,” said Santorum.

    George Pataki’s crystal ball?

    Does former New York Gov. George Pataki know something we don’t know? Just minutes into the undercard debate, he mistakenly referred to Donald Trump as the “president.”

    When asked about Trump’s proposal to ban Muslims from entering the United States, he said: “It’s one of the many absurd things this president has said.”

    “Donald Trump is the know-nothing candidate of the 21st century and cannot be our nominee,” he added.

    Pataki’s slip came moments before he declared frontrunners in both parties, Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump, not “fit” for the role of Commander in Chief.

    “Hillary Clinton won’t call ISIS by its name and has continually lied to the American people,” Pataki said. “On the other hand, Donald Trump continually demonizes and demeans millions of Americans. Neither is fit to be president of the United States.”

    Graham invokes "The Princess Bride"

    Graham went after Sen. Cruz over whether he would keep Assad in power by using a famous line from Cruz’s favorite movie to quote on the campaign trail.

    “His favorite movie is apparently "The Princess Bride,” challenged Graham. “Ted, getting in bed with Iran and Russia to save Assad is “‘inconceivable!’”

    “Princess Buttercup would not like this.”

    http://abcnews.go.com/Politics/momen...ry?id=35759646

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    Re: Fox News announces candidate line-up for prime-time debate

    And I say, if it is not a problem, then why does it dominate world news. Trump knows that it has to be dealt with. I vote Putin for Australian PM.
    If it's not true, don't say it. If it's not yours, don't take it. If it's not right, don't do it.

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    Re: Fox News announces candidate line-up for prime-time debate

    Fact checking the 5th Republican debate

    WASHINGTON €” The vast complexities of a dangerous world were cast in too-simple terms in the latest Republican presidential debate.

    Here€™s a look at some of the claims Tuesday night and how they compare with the facts:

    TED CRUZ: €œYou would carpet bomb where ISIS is, not a city.€

    THE FACTS: The Texas senator€™s conviction that the Islamic State group can be routed with an air campaign of overwhelming force is hard to square with the reality on the ground. ISIS fighters are holed up in a variety of cities, amid civilians, raising questions about how he could direct a carpet bombing that only singles out the enemy.

    He was asked in the debate if he€™d be willing to cause civilian casualties in Raqqa, a major Syrian city that has become de facto capital of the Islamic State group€™s so-called caliphate. ISIS is also in control of the Iraqi city of Mosul.

    DONALD TRUMP: €œOur country is out of control. People are pouring through the southern border.€

    THE FACTS: Arrest statistics are widely regarded as the best measure, if an imperfect one, of the flow of people crossing illegally into the U.S. And Trump€™s suggestion that illegal immigration is increasing at the border is not supported by arrest statistics discussed in recent months by Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson.

    Johnson has said that during the 2015 budget year that ended in September, about 330,000 people were caught crossing the Mexican border illegally, a near 40-year low in border arrests. During the 2014 budget year, roughly 486,000 people were arrested.

    In recent months there has been a spike in the arrests at the border, but primarily of children traveling alone and families, mostly from Central America.

    JEB BUSH: €œWe need to embed our forces, our troops, inside the Iraqi military.€

    THE FACTS: The U.S. is already doing that.

    U.S. special forces are working side by side with Iraqi forces in the fight against Islamic State militants and American military advisers and trainers are working with Iraqi troops in various locations. To be sure, Bush has called for an intensification of the military effort in a variety of ways, but debate viewers would not know from his comment that U.S. troops are already operating with Iraqi and Kurdish forces.

    His comment fits a pattern in the Republican race as a number of candidates criticize President Barack Obama€™s course against ISIS while proposing largely the same steps that are already underway.

    CRUZ: €œAnd even worse, President Obama and Hillary Clinton are proposing bringing tens of thousands of Syrian refugees to this country when the head of the FBI has told Congress they cannot vet those refugees.€

    THE FACTS: Cruz repeated inflated estimates of how many Syrian refugees the Obama administration plans to admit to the United States. Obama has announced plans to resettle about 10,000 refugees in the next year.

    The vetting process for refugees takes, on average, about two years and is routinely longer for refugees from Syria and Iraq. The administration has said refugees being considered for resettlement in the United States are subject to additional scrutiny. The administration has declined to describe what the scrutiny involves, saying it is classified.

    CARLY FIORINA, speaking of security threats to the U.S.: €œWe need the private sector€™s help because the government is not innovating, technology is running ahead by leaps and bounds€They must be engaged and they must be asked. I will ask them.€

    THE FACTS: They€™ve been asked.

    The Obama administration has been in discussions with technology companies, especially in Silicon Valley, over the last year about the use of encrypted communications and how the government can penetrate them for national security purposes. After the attack in San Bernardino, California, Obama again said he would urge high-tech and law enforcement leaders to make it harder for terrorists to use technology to escape justice.

    That€™s not to say the effort has been effective. But as in the case of candidates talking about the campaign against ISIS, Fiorina pitches something that is in motion.

    CRUZ: €œWe didn€™t monitor the Facebook page of the San Bernardino terrorist because DHS thought it would be inappropriate.€

    THE FACTS: The Department of Homeland Security has authority to look at social media such as Facebook when evaluating visa applications, and the agency says it does so in some cases. But some experts say that scrutinizing social media accounts of every visa applicant would dramatically slow the approval process, including for tourist visas.

    It€™s also unclear whether looking at the Facebook pages of the shooters in the California attacks would have prevented the attacks.

    The male attacker, Syed Farook, was a U.S. citizen, born in Illinois, and never needed a visa. His wife, attacker Tashfeen Malik, 29, did enter the country on a fiancee visa and had used social media to speak of martyrdom and jihad. But Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif., has said such posts weren€™t public. After the attacks, Facebook did find a profile under an alias linked to Malik with a post pledging her allegiance to the Islamic State.

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    December 15, 2015 at 10:35 PM EST | Updated: Dec 15, 2015 at 11:20 PM
    Republican U.S. presidential candidates businessman Donald Trump (L) and former Governor Jeb Bush (R) are seen debating on video monitors in the debate press room during the Republican presidential debate in Las Vegas, Nevada December 15, 2015. Photo by David Becker/Reuters
    Republican U.S. presidential candidates businessman Donald Trump, left, and former Governor Jeb Bush. Photo by David Becker/Reuters

    WASHINGTON €” The vast complexities of a dangerous world were cast in too-simple terms in the latest Republican presidential debate.

    Here€™s a look at some of the claims Tuesday night and how they compare with the facts:

    TED CRUZ: €œYou would carpet bomb where ISIS is, not a city.€

    THE FACTS: The Texas senator€™s conviction that the Islamic State group can be routed with an air campaign of overwhelming force is hard to square with the reality on the ground. ISIS fighters are holed up in a variety of cities, amid civilians, raising questions about how he could direct a carpet bombing that only singles out the enemy.

    He was asked in the debate if he€™d be willing to cause civilian casualties in Raqqa, a major Syrian city that has become de facto capital of the Islamic State group€™s so-called caliphate. ISIS is also in control of the Iraqi city of Mosul.

    DONALD TRUMP: €œOur country is out of control. People are pouring through the southern border.€

    THE FACTS: Arrest statistics are widely regarded as the best measure, if an imperfect one, of the flow of people crossing illegally into the U.S. And Trump€™s suggestion that illegal immigration is increasing at the border is not supported by arrest statistics discussed in recent months by Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson.

    Johnson has said that during the 2015 budget year that ended in September, about 330,000 people were caught crossing the Mexican border illegally, a near 40-year low in border arrests. During the 2014 budget year, roughly 486,000 people were arrested.

    In recent months there has been a spike in the arrests at the border, but primarily of children traveling alone and families, mostly from Central America.

    JEB BUSH: €œWe need to embed our forces, our troops, inside the Iraqi military.€

    THE FACTS: The U.S. is already doing that.

    U.S. special forces are working side by side with Iraqi forces in the fight against Islamic State militants and American military advisers and trainers are working with Iraqi troops in various locations. To be sure, Bush has called for an intensification of the military effort in a variety of ways, but debate viewers would not know from his comment that U.S. troops are already operating with Iraqi and Kurdish forces.

    His comment fits a pattern in the Republican race as a number of candidates criticize President Barack Obama€™s course against ISIS while proposing largely the same steps that are already underway.

    CRUZ: €œAnd even worse, President Obama and Hillary Clinton are proposing bringing tens of thousands of Syrian refugees to this country when the head of the FBI has told Congress they cannot vet those refugees.€

    THE FACTS: Cruz repeated inflated estimates of how many Syrian refugees the Obama administration plans to admit to the United States. Obama has announced plans to resettle about 10,000 refugees in the next year.

    The vetting process for refugees takes, on average, about two years and is routinely longer for refugees from Syria and Iraq. The administration has said refugees being considered for resettlement in the United States are subject to additional scrutiny. The administration has declined to describe what the scrutiny involves, saying it is classified.

    CARLY FIORINA, speaking of security threats to the U.S.: €œWe need the private sector€™s help because the government is not innovating, technology is running ahead by leaps and bounds€They must be engaged and they must be asked. I will ask them.€

    THE FACTS: They€™ve been asked.

    The Obama administration has been in discussions with technology companies, especially in Silicon Valley, over the last year about the use of encrypted communications and how the government can penetrate them for national security purposes. After the attack in San Bernardino, California, Obama again said he would urge high-tech and law enforcement leaders to make it harder for terrorists to use technology to escape justice.

    That€™s not to say the effort has been effective. But as in the case of candidates talking about the campaign against ISIS, Fiorina pitches something that is in motion.

    CRUZ: €œWe didn€™t monitor the Facebook page of the San Bernardino terrorist because DHS thought it would be inappropriate.€

    THE FACTS: The Department of Homeland Security has authority to look at social media such as Facebook when evaluating visa applications, and the agency says it does so in some cases. But some experts say that scrutinizing social media accounts of every visa applicant would dramatically slow the approval process, including for tourist visas.

    It€™s also unclear whether looking at the Facebook pages of the shooters in the California attacks would have prevented the attacks.

    The male attacker, Syed Farook, was a U.S. citizen, born in Illinois, and never needed a visa. His wife, attacker Tashfeen Malik, 29, did enter the country on a fiancee visa and had used social media to speak of martyrdom and jihad. But Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif., has said such posts weren€™t public. After the attacks, Facebook did find a profile under an alias linked to Malik with a post pledging her allegiance to the Islamic State.

    Republican U.S. presidential candidate Senator Ted Cruz speaks during the Republican presidential debate in Las Vegas, Nevada December 15, 2015. Photo by Mike Blake/Reuters
    Republican U.S. presidential candidate Senator Ted Cruz during the Republican presidential debate in Las Vegas Tuesday. Photo by Mike Blake/Reuters

    CRUZ: €œModerate rebels end up being jihadists.€

    THE FACTS: Cruz did not acknowledge in his blanket warning that moderate rebel groups in Syria have been fighting against the Islamic State group, the al-Qaida-aligned Nusra Front and forces loyal to Syrian President Bashar Assad since the start of that country€™s civil war.

    While there has been concern over U.S.-trained Syrian rebels handing over some of their equipment to the Nusra Front in exchange for safe passage, they are considered key in the fight against both radical groups and Assad €” a leader who a number of GOP candidates said in the debate should be removed because of his close alliance with Iraq.

    MARCO RUBIO on facing terrorist threats: €œWe need more tools, not less tools. And that tool we lost, the metadata program, was a valuable tool that we no longer have at our disposal.€

    CRUZ: The USA Freedom Act passed by Congress ended the federal government€™s bulk collection of telephone metadata for all Americans, and €œstrengthened the tools of national security and law enforcement to go after terrorists.€

    THE FACTS: Both are right, but are emphasizing different aspects of the new law. While the government has lost speed and ability to reach back in time, it has gained volume of coverage.

    The controversial NSA surveillance program revealed by leaker Edward Snowden had allowed the intelligence community to quickly analyze five years of calling records in search of connections among Americans and foreign terror suspects.

    Under the new law, the government can no longer collect and store calling data. Instead, it has to request a search of data held by the phone companies, which typically hold the records for two years. It€™s unclear how quickly those searches can take place, but it€™s probably longer than in the previous system. Rubio is correct in this regard.

    Cruz is correct that under the prior program, a large segment of mobile phone records went uncollected. Under the new regime, a larger universe of phone records can be searched.

    What neither acknowledged is that the phone records program was not regarded inside NSA as an important tool in ferreting out terrorism plots. The only case the government has said was cracked because of the program over a decade was a relatively minor terrorist financing scheme.

    See article, videos and comments here:

    http://www.pbs.org/newshour/rundown/...ers-go-astray/

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    Re: Fox News announces candidate line-up for prime-time debate

    Sen. Lindsey Graham helped shape GOP primary debate
    Mary Troyan, USA Today 5:23 p.m. EST December 21, 2015

    WASHINGTON – Sen. Lindsey Graham spent seven months pushing his fellow Republicans toward a more aggressive foreign policy -- but failing to catch on with voters -- before announcing Monday he would end his presidential campaign.

    Graham, 60, will remain in the Senate, where he has five years left in his third term representing South Carolina.

    He announced his decision in a video and email addressing his supporters.

    "While we have run a campaign that has made a real difference, I have concluded this is not my time," Graham said.

    Graham's focus on national security and the war against terrorism helped shape the overall GOP primary debate, but he wasn't well known outside South Carolina or the Senate. He never polled above single digits nationally or in the early voting states, and his support back home slipped as he traveled in New Hampshire and Iowa.

    Read more and watch video here:

    http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/p...-bid/77690620/

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    Re: Fox News announces candidate line-up for prime-time debate

    An Expert on Bullying Explains Donald Trumps Mean, Consequence-Free Rise
    By Jesse Singal Follow @jessesingal

    It's clear at this point that Donald Trump acts more like a bully than a "traditional" presidential candidate. The current leader in the GOP polls gleefully flouts all of the usual rules of political and social decorum, constantly launching attacks many of them rather offensive against both his political rivals and members of the media he believes have treated him unfairly. Earlier this week, he released a short video making fun of Jeb Bush who was supposed to be creaming him in the polls by now for being such a boring speaker; the video shows a Bush supporter snoozing while the candidate discusses health-savings accounts. And as the Cut noted, a new profile in Rolling Stone has him making some rather harsh comments about Carly Fiorina's physical appearance.

    Part of what's been strange about the trajectory of the campaign so far is that Trump hasn't been punished, in any real sense, for engaging in the sort of behavior that almost everyone agrees is terrible in any setting. Yes, each gross incident is followed by a wave of denunciations, but they don't seem to have an impact if anything, Trump seems to be gaining popularity by bullying. He's now the first GOP candidate to break 30 percent in the polls. Even non-supporters the media very much included seem more transfixed than indignant.

    Related StoriesHow to Win Your Next Political Argument Psychologists Are Learning How to Convince Conservatives to Take Climate Change Seriously
    This isn't an unusual dynamic in many real-world bullying settings. So examining Trump's behavior through the lens of bullying research can offer up some insights into how he has been so successful so far, and why his rivals have been unable to knock him down a peg. Jaana Juvonen, a psychologist at UCLA who is the co-author of a recent literature review and an upcoming book chapter about bullying, said that Trump seems to tick many of the requisite boxes when it comes to how bullies act. Not that bullies are a uniform, homogeneous group, but the sort of classic bully is one who is narcissistic, is after power, often charismatic, and therefore popular, she said. Check, check, check, and check. But she said theres an important and interesting distinction between being popular and being liked many bullies may have high status in that their classmates rate them as popular, Juvonen explained, but when individual students are asked if theyd like to spend time with the bully, they respond with resounding nos. This dynamic might help explain some of the personnel shuffling and general chaos that went on in the early days of Trumps campaign.

    Bullies also feel really good about themselves, said Juvonen a description that certainly appears to apply to Trump. But its a shallow sort of confidence. They come out looking like they have very high self-esteem, she explained, but one way to think about it is that self-esteem is so highly dependent on the popularity, so if theres any problem, if somebody dares to criticize them, that might make them more vulnerable ... [So] when somebody criticizes them, they attack immediately they cant stand that they are being criticized.

    Trumps nasty spat with Megyn Kelly, the Fox News commentator who co-moderated the first GOP debate, immediately comes to mind, as do his anti-Jeb comments. In both cases, he seems to have reserved special ire and bile for people he likely perceives as posing serious threats to his current status as front-runner: Kelly since she asked tough questions highlighting his past misogynistic comments during the first GOP debate, and Bush since he's still seen by many in Establishment circles as the most likely "real" front-runner to emerge once the zaniness of early primary season has receded (though the number of people who believe this will happen may well be shrinking).

    So, given that Trump pretty clearly fits the pattern of a bully, whats the best move for political rivals hoping to counter him and his hot-tempered rhetoric? Juvonen said she hasnt seen much evidence of Trumps targets unifying to aggressively go after Trump, and that this, too, fits a standard bullying pattern. Thats a classic bystander effect they are No. 1, afraid of their reputation; they are afraid that he will next target them if they criticize him. And again, in the school context, when we talk about bullying among kids one of the most effective ways to deal with bullies is that the kids are united. So in fact, if I were advising the Republican Party Id say to the other candidates, 'You guys, together, should be shooting Trump down,' since theres more power in numbers when the bystanders feel like they are not making themselves personally vulnerable by alone criticizing Trump, but if they were more united they would have a chance to deal with him.

    Strictly speaking, as Ezra Klein wrote in August, the GOP and its conservative allies have tried to gang up on Trump the effort just didnt really work. Meanwhile, some candidates Ted Cruz and Ben Carson have made it clear that, as of this moment, theyre not interested in forming a united front against the bully (Carson reversed course a little yesterday, but offered up only tepid anti-Trump remarks). Even Bush has more or less acknowledged that he wont go after Trump with Trump-like levels of vigor unless Trump attacks his family hes preferred to offer up factual rebuttals of Trumps claims he is low-energy. (Imagine one boy calling another boy a nerd on the playground, and the bullied kid responds, Actually, Im not a nerd and here are some reasons why ) In other words, one could be forgiven for developing the impression that no one is effectively pushing back against Trump's bullying.

    They feel like theyre going to be the next target, Juvonen said of bystanders and victims in bullying situations. They dont want to further risk their status or make themselves more vulnerable, so they know to stay quiet. But then the bully has further promoted his status, because nobody is now publicly coming out to say, 'Wait a minute, this is not right what youre doing' ... thats why you need a coalition, you need a united force. As of yet, that united force hasnt quite emerged in the GOP primary. The bully is still shoving and screaming his way across the playground, and the teachers are nowhere in sight.

    http://nymag.com/scienceofus/2015/09...ald-trump.html

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    Re: Fox News announces candidate line-up for prime-time debate

    The nation’s first Hispanic president? Why no one’s talking about that

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    BY DANIEL BUSH December 24, 2015 at 5:33 PM EST
    Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
    Senator Marco Rubio has a shot at becoming the first Hispanic presidential nominee, but his ethnicity has not been a focus in the 2016 election. Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

    In 2013, a Pew survey asked Latino-Americans the following question: “Who is the country’s most important Hispanic leader?” The top answer, at 62 percent, was “don’t know,” followed by “no one.”

    Two years later, Republican Senators Ted Cruz and Marco Rubio both have a legitimate shot at becoming the nation’s first Hispanic presidential nominee. And yet their ethnicity has received far less attention than Barack Obama’s race did when he ran for president eight years ago.

    What’s different about identity politics this time around?

    Like candidate Obama, both freshman senators have been reluctant to speak directly about their Latino backgrounds on the campaign trail. Both Cruz and Rubio have spoken at length about their parents’ immigrant stories, but they have not stressed their ethnic heritage. The Republican Party’s internal debate over immigration has also made it extremely difficult for Rubio and Cruz, who are both Cuban-American, but have taken different approaches to their Latino identity, to build a political narrative around their status as trailblazing candidates.

    Read more here: http://www.pbs.org/newshour/updates/...paign=newshour

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    Re: Fox News announces candidate line-up for prime-time debate

    Christie gains in N.H. and Trump notices
    o candidate has spent more time in New Hampshire than Christie (33 visits covering 61 days since 2013) and when Christie isn’t there, he pops up on TV in a commercial.

    With the pivotal New Hampshire presidential primary just six weeks away, Chris Christie is getting to the point where he can starting putting some heat on Republican frontrunner Donald Trump.

    And Trump has noticed.

    Read more here: http://www.app.com/story/news/politi...hire/77993996/

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    Re: Fox News announces candidate line-up for prime-time debate

    Politics
    Donald Trump’s provocative first TV ad raises the temperature of GOP race

    See video and read article here: https://www.washingtonpost.com/polit...79a_story.html

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