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  1. #11
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    Re: Fox News announces candidate line-up for prime-time debate

    What is strange is how the Republican National Party is distancing itself from Mr. Trump, when the largest majority of Republican people seem to like him.

    Perhaps the RNP needs to remember that the Republican-voting people are the real force behind the Republicans, not the select few who run the National party.

    RickThai

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    Re: Fox News announces candidate line-up for prime-time debate

    The Republican Party seems to be at odds with itself. There was a good speel on Morning Joe, which I have not been able to find to share here. However, I did find some video highlights of last night's debate, along with an interview with Lindsay Graham.

    http://www.msnbc.com/morning-joe/wat...y-500210755901

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  4. #13
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    Re: Fox News announces candidate line-up for prime-time debate

    Analysis: Republican Party divisions nearly upstage Donald Trump in first 2016 debate
    By David Lauter

    The theatrical drama of the first Republican debate Thursday focused on the man at center stage in Cleveland, Donald Trump, and the bombastic rhetoric he has used to propel himself to the front of the GOP field.

    But when the Republicans return to the same arena next summer for their convention, it is extremely unlikely that Trump will be the party's nominee, given that a wide swath of the party, particularly its elected officials, finds him unacceptable.

    So even as the Fox News moderators grappled with the billionaire real estate developer over his history of bankruptcies, past support for Democratic politicians and sometimes offensive statements, a separate and probably more consequential debate was taking place among the other candidates about which of two competing paths the party should follow to win the 2016 election.

    Four years ago, the 20 debates that the Republican candidates participated in consistently drove the party to the right. GOP leaders, looking back after the election, decided that the debates had harmed their eventual nominee, Mitt Romney, and vowed to avoid that this time.

    But in Thursday's debate, the party's continued division over which direction to take remained very much on display.

    One side looks at the party's dismal record in presidential elections — losing the popular vote in five of the last six — and the demographic tides and argues that Republicans need to reach out in order to appeal to a changing nation.

    The other side looks at the party's streak of victories in congressional and state elections, capped by a near-sweep of contested races in 2014, and says the key to victory is to reach in, to find ways to awaken what they see as a conservative majority just waiting for the right candidate to stir it to life.

    The tension between those two views ran through the debate.

    The three candidates from the country's two most populous swing states, former Gov. Jeb Bush and Sen. Marco Rubio from Florida and Gov. John Kasich from Ohio, all base their campaigns on the outreach theory. So, too, does Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky, though he emphasizes a different set of issues than the other three.

    On the other side stand Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas and Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker, along with former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee.

    Cruz and Walker both won their current jobs by organizing and motivating conservative voters, and both say they can repeat that strategy in a general election. Huckabee has based his campaign almost entirely on his appeal to evangelical voters.

    The difference between the two camps could be seen on one issue after another.

    On immigration, for example, Bush criticized those who "talk about this as a wedge issue" and defended his support for "earned legal status" for those in the country illegally.

    Walker, who has admitted changing his mind on the issue, emphasized the conservative slogan of "no amnesty," insisting on the "need to secure the border" before any other reforms can be considered.

    Cruz turned the question into an opportunity to denounce Congress' GOP leadership, with whom he has conducted an extended feud.

    "We keep winning elections," Cruz said, but "we don't have leaders who honor their commitments" to a conservative agenda.

    Kasich, asked about same-sex marriage, noted that he had recently attended the wedding of a gay friend and added, "We need to give everybody a chance — treat everybody with respect." The Supreme Court has ruled on the issue, he said, and "we'll accept it."

    Huckabee, when asked about abortion, denounced the high court. "The Supreme Court is not the Supreme Being," he said.

    Democrats have their divisions too, of course, with the party's left-wing activists pushing for greater efforts to redistribute income, tougher limits on big banks and stronger environmental regulations. But the splits among Republicans run deeper.

    The divisions within the GOP repeatedly have hamstrung the party's congressional majority, undermining Speaker John A. Boehner's authority in the House and challenging Majority Leader's Mitch McConnell's power in the Senate. The split could become even more dramatic this fall as a fight over federal money for Planned Parenthood threatens to lead to a government shutdown.

    Many conservative strategists see that threatened fight as an opportunity — a way to rally core supporters by combining opposition to abortion with the GOP's message of limited government and restricting federal spending.


    In Thursday's debate, several candidates allied themselves with that sentiment, noting that they had cut off funds for Planned Parenthood in their states or favored doing so.

    But Republican establishment figures, including McConnell of Kentucky, see the conservative plan as an intolerable risk. They fear that the public, which polls show already sees the GOP as the more extreme party, will blame Republicans for any government shutdown.

    "One of my favorite old Kentucky sayings is, 'There's no education in the second kick of a mule.' We've been down this path before," McConnell said at a news conference hours before the debate. He was referring to previous shutdowns going back to the Clinton administration.

    How that tension within the party will be resolved will not be clear for at least six months, but Thursday's debate began the process. Until now, the GOP field has steadily grown. From here on, the winnowing begins.

    david.lauter@latimes.com

    Copyright © 2015, Chicago Tribune

    http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/n...email-Daywatch

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    Re: Fox News announces candidate line-up for prime-time debate

    Editorial: The Republican candidates' debt to Donald Trump

    Jeb Bush hadn't debated political foes since 2002. In the early months of this presidential race, he's at times seemed uncertain, out of practice. But in Thursday night's debate he spoke with candor and took risks. Why so? We credit the man to Bush's right, the carnival barker who — like or loathe his bloviations — has breathed energy into the Republican campaign. An outspoken Donald Trump frees other candidates to abandon their talking points. Witness Bush talking forcefully about immigration reform, or John Kasich just as forcefully defending his expansion of Medicaid in Ohio.

    These aren't the hard-right positions that are supposed to win Republican nomination fights. But why not? So-called compassionate conservatism sounds positively mainstream when Trump is doubling down, alone among 10 candidates in refusing to pledge his support to the eventual GOP nominee, or to not run as an independent.

    We don't know whether Trump's lead in the polls means his backers have anything more than a summer crush. If and when he fades, the surviving candidates will owe him a debt. He has Americans of both major parties focused on one party's race. Watching the debate you could see how liberating a presence he is — parlaying a question about his rudeness into an ode to impatience: "This country doesn't win anymore ... We lose to everybody ... We need strength, energy, quickness and brain to turn that around."

    Rehearsed talking points from Ted Cruz, Scott Walker and Chris Christie couldn't match that. Rand Paul looked practiced and shrill, particularly in a mistaken attack on Trump, when Trump said what we (and surely other viewers) were thinking: "I don't think you heard me. You're having a hard time tonight." Paul's candidacy suddenly looked as if it had peaked in 2014.

    Debates will do that. As Thursday night progressed, viewers watched these 10 candidates cleave into two groups: doers and talkers. Four current and former governors — Bush, Christie, Kasich and Walker — generally projected an interest in solutions. We'd add Marco Rubio, a sitting U.S. senator, to that list. Cruz, Paul and retired neurosurgeon Ben Carson, by contrast, generally projected an interest in their talking points. Same for one ex-governor, Mike Huckabee.

    By the 90th minute we were watching a field of 17 candidates begin to constrict. Not because the debate was the demolition derby that some pundits had anticipated. Instead the presence of a disruptive, mouthy yet good-humored interloper left some others on the stage looking less like politicians and more like engaging leaders.

    Example: Jeb Bush on the burden of being a Bush when many voters think the last thing America needs is another Bush in the White House? He at times has struggled with that question. Thursday night he didn't. "Maybe the bar is higher for me," he offered. "That's fine." Question defanged.

    Early on, Kasich allowed that Trump has struck a nerve — he appeals to Americans who are frustrated by problems yet who see their federal government as unable to cope.

    Whatever the fate of his candidacy, Trump is making better candidates of the Republicans in this race. He is forcing them to talk to, and with, those frustrated Americans.


    Unimpressed? You should have watched the early-bird debate, when Carly Fiorina lapped the six other candidates who hadn't cracked the top 10. One jab: her pledge to open her presidency with two phone calls — first to assure Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu that America stands with Israel, second to warn Ayatollah Ali Khamenei that until he agrees to inspections "anytime, anywhere," the U.S. locks Iran out of the global money system. Her rival Rick Perry raved that if Fiorina, not Secretary of State John Kerry, had bargained with Iran, "Maybe we would've gotten a deal where we didn't give everything away."

    Final verdict: We elect a new president in 459 days. It's early.

    Copyright © 2015, Chicago Tribune

    http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/o...806-story.html

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    Re: Fox News announces candidate line-up for prime-time debate

    There was more controversy yesterday concerning comments Mr. Trump made about Megyn Kelly. I will not place the article here on this forum, and once you read it (if you choose to google 'Trump's comments on Megyn Kelly') I think you will understand why I chose not to put it here.

    It is my opinion that Donald Trump gets much more media attention that he should get. He can, after all, pay for his own publicity. So here I am yakking away about him.

    Is he the man we love to hate, or the man we love to love?

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    Re: Fox News announces candidate line-up for prime-time debate

    "But the New York tycoon has tapped into an anger and resentment among rank and file conservatives, who feel that establishment politicians are ignoring their concerns and diminishing their issues."

    I believe this is true, however I'm not convinced he even wants to be president. Maybe he is just going to ride this wave and see where it takes him. If he wins, fine, if not he'll just go on to whatever comes next.

    Have people in the USA become so enthralled with reality tv that we are now going to elect political candidates based on reality tv type competetions?

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    Re: Fox News announces candidate line-up for prime-time debate

    You might have a point.

    His run for the nomination may be nothing more than an egotistical platform to get his views across or simply provoke people (i.e. a troll).

    The kindest thing I can say for Trump is that he appears brutally honest as far as voicing his opinions, provided what he says is actually his opinions.

    RickThai

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    Re: Fox News announces candidate line-up for prime-time debate

    He seems to speak so spontaneously and says just whatever is on his mind, so I believe he is really speaking his mind. But I really don't know, of course.

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    Re: Fox News announces candidate line-up for prime-time debate

    Will the Real Bobby Jindal Please Stand Up?
    India Currents, Commentary, Sarita Sarvate, Posted: Aug 06, 2015

    Whenever Louisiana Governor Bobby Jindal talks, I cringe. He reminds me of Peter Sellers trying to imitate an Indian guy pretending to be a Southerner. Or rather, lacking Peter Seller’s talent, he sounds like a B-actor playing a bumbling Indian imitating a Southern politician.

    Bobby Jindal is God’s gift to American comedians. In an effort to outdo all the other farcical characters in the field of 2016 Republican presidential candidates, he is being as outlandishly ridiculous as possible.

    What happened to Bobby Jindal?

    What happened to Jindal I think is what happens to most educated, smart Republican politicians. They have to dumb it down. They have to adhere to the Ronald Reagan role model. The trouble is, they cannot imitate Ronald Reagan’s affability, his genuine simplicity, his lack of intellectual depth. So they resort to stupid statements to attract the base. The beneficiaries of their extreme policies might be the one percent, but they need the other ninety nine percent to get elected. So they couch everything in the language of religion and tradition, language that the average Joe in Peoria will understand.

    And they follow the Republican playbook, one of the founding principles of which is to vilify and insult our current President.

    Even so, the things Bobby Jindal has said and done recently should make us all feel embarrassed and worried.

    He recently said, for example, that Obama should get his tuition back from Harvard because “he learned nothing” there.

    Moreover, standing on the White House grounds, he declared that “Obama was not fit to be Commander in Chief.”

    He signed into law Louisiana’s Science Education Act, which enables the state’s schools to teach creationism. This, in spite of the fact that Jindal has an honor’s degree in biology.

    He believes that hurricanes and tornadoes are caused by sins like homosexuality. At least that is what a brochure circulated at a prayer rally organized by him implies. “We have watched sin escalate to a proportion the nation has never seen before,” the pamphlet says. “We live in the first generation in which … homosexuality has been embraced…While the United States still claims to be a nation ‘under God’ it is obvious that we have greatly strayed from our foundations in Christianity. This year we have seen a dramatic increase in tornadoes that have taken the lives of many … and let us not forget that we are only six years from the tragic events of Hurricane Katrina …”

    Hours after the Louisiana legislature killed a bill that would have discriminated against gays and lesbians, Jindal issued an executive order on “Religious Freedom” allowing corporations and organizations to exercise their religious beliefs by effectively giving them an option to deny services to same-sex couples.

    In the wake of the South Carolina shootings, he did not speak in favor of getting rid of the confederate flag from official buildings, instead suggesting that the States should make that decision.

    His campaign slogan is: “Tanned. Rested. Ready.” Does he really think he is so white that he can actually get tanned?

    The video announcing his presidential bid showed him threatening his kids with “not going to Iowa” if they did not support his candidacy. Is he so out of touch with reality that he does not realize only politicians want to go to Iowa?

    As I write these words, Jindal announced an investigation into Planned Parenthood after a religious, anti-abortion organization accused it of “selling human body parts.”

    I wonder if Jindal realizes that no one believes him when he opens his mouth and starts talking in that weird accent. Growing up with Indian parents, how many second generation children speak that way?

    It is not Jindal’s rejection of the hyphenated ethnic identity that bothers me. In fact, that is one aspect of his personality that I could easily get behind; I do believe in being a global villager. What bothers me and possibly many other Indian-Americans is that he is not credible. His persona is completely fake. No one believes that he had a religious epiphany and converted to Christianity. People are convinced that he did it for political expediency.

    Will the real Bobby Jindal please stand up? Will he quit being a caricature of a politician and start being himself? Will he realize that people are tired of inauthenticity in politics and that they want politicians to be genuine?

    In this election season, when Bernie Sanders is drawing large crowds at campaign events simply because he speaks his mind, will Bobby Jindal stop mouthing hackneyed GOP slogans?

    Or should we give him a dose of his own medicine and ask him to surrender his diploma from Brown University as well as the money for his Rhodes Scholarship for being too stupid to have deserved either one?

    http://newamericamedia.org/2015/08/w...e-stand-up.php

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