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  1. #301
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    Re: Fox News announces candidate line-up for prime-time debate

    More than 120 Republicans tell RNC to cut off funds to Donald Trump

    A letter that urges the Republican National Committee to cut off funds to Donald Trump has collected more than 120 signatures from current and former elected officials, according to the final version obtained by CBS News.

    The letter, which will be delivered to RNC Chairman Reince Priebus Tuesday, includes two sitting members of Congress and 27 former RNC staffers, among many others.

    "Given the catastrophic impact that Donald Trump's losing presidential campaign will have on down-ballot Senate and House races, we urge you to immediately suspend all discretionary RNC support for Trump and focus the entirety of the RNC's available resources on preserving the GOP's congressional majorities," says the letter, whose draft CBS reported on last week when there were already 70 signatures.

    It adds that Trump's chances of winning in November are "evaporating by the day."

    Reps. Reid Ribble, Wisconsin and Scott Rigell, R-Virginia, have signed the letter. Both lawmakers are retiring from Congress at the end of the year and Ribble had endorsed Ted Cruz for president during the primaries and Rigell recently endorsed Libertarian Gary Johnson.

    The letter was signed by Republicans who have served in every GOP administration since President Ronald Reagan, nine advisers on the last nine GOP presidential campaigns as well as former congressional aides.

    They warn that Trump is a threat to House and Senate Republicans up for re-election and that the RNC should only focus on those down-ballot races instead.

    "We believe that Donald Trump's divisiveness, recklessness, incompetence, and record-breaking unpopularity risk turning this election into a Democratic landslide, and only the immediate shift of all available RNC resources to vulnerable Senate and House races will prevent the GOP from drowning with a Trump-emblazoned anchor around its neck," the letter says.

    The group added that every dollar the RNC spends on Trump's campaign "is a dollar of donor money wasted on the losing effort of a candidate who has actively undermined the GOP at every turn."

    Andrew Weinstein, a former aide to former Speaker Newt Gingrich, helped organize the writing of the letter.

    http://www.cbsnews.com/news/more-tha...-donald-trump/

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    Re: Fox News announces candidate line-up for prime-time debate

    This article is from last March, but still relevant as it is currently in the news.

    Donald Trump Is Understating His Debt by $500 Million by Shawn Tully MARCH 23, 2016, 2:27 PM EDT

    It’s the one thing he’s not bragging about.
    On the campaign trail, Donald Trump has said dealing with the nation’s $18 trillion debt will be easy. One reason: Trump could just choose to ignore it. That appears to be how Trump has dealt with some of the debt on his own balance sheet.

    You’d think that disclosing the total amount one owes would be an essential line item in any net worth statement, but that figure appears nowhere in Trump’s most recently released balance sheet. The Donald does list a category called “loans and mortgages,” but that number surprisingly excludes the debt Trump has on a number of buildings that he is a partial owner of, as well as debt he carries on a pile of assets that Trump says are worth over $300 million, but he just labels as “other.”

    In a previous story, I found that in public financial disclosures, Donald Trump was counting revenues from golf courses, hotel rooms, and sundry sources as “income.” Since Trump didn’t subtract salaries, utilities, maintenance and all the other routine costs, the big numbers he’s trumpeting aren’t income at all, but gross sales. Just as he was overstating his income, his financial statement appears to be understating the size of his debt. The Donald clearly believes that the public deserves no more than a murky view of his own debt picture.

    (For another look at Trump’s wealth read: A Look Inside Donald Trump’s Lavish $200 Million ‘Palace’)

    Through heavy digging, Fortune identified the loans Trump has on these other buildings that are not included on his released balance sheet. Add to the loans and mortgages he does disclose and Fortune has determined that Trump’s total debt balloons to nearly $1 billion, or about double what he specifically acknowledges he owes. And it could be even larger.

    It’s the one thing he’s not bragging about.
    On the campaign trail, Donald Trump has said dealing with the nation’s $18 trillion debt will be easy. One reason: Trump could just choose to ignore it. That appears to be how Trump has dealt with some of the debt on his own balance sheet.

    You’d think that disclosing the total amount one owes would be an essential line item in any net worth statement, but that figure appears nowhere in Trump’s most recently released balance sheet. The Donald does list a category called “loans and mortgages,” but that number surprisingly excludes the debt Trump has on a number of buildings that he is a partial owner of, as well as debt he carries on a pile of assets that Trump says are worth over $300 million, but he just labels as “other.”

    In a previous story, I found that in public financial disclosures, Donald Trump was counting revenues from golf courses, hotel rooms, and sundry sources as “income.” Since Trump didn’t subtract salaries, utilities, maintenance and all the other routine costs, the big numbers he’s trumpeting aren’t income at all, but gross sales. Just as he was overstating his income, his financial statement appears to be understating the size of his debt. The Donald clearly believes that the public deserves no more than a murky view of his own debt picture.

    (For another look at Trump’s wealth read: A Look Inside Donald Trump’s Lavish $200 Million ‘Palace’)

    Through heavy digging, Fortune identified the loans Trump has on these other buildings that are not included on his released balance sheet. Add to the loans and mortgages he does disclose and Fortune has determined that Trump’s total debt balloons to nearly $1 billion, or about double what he specifically acknowledges he owes. And it could be even larger.


    What’s more, Trump, even though he says he isn’t, by Fortune‘s calculations appears to be ignoring debt when calculating his equity in two of his most prestigious properties that are at the heart of his commercial office portfolio. He claims that portfolio is worth $1 billion. But factor in debt and it may only be worth half of that. Put it together and you get a better picture of why Trump is likely worth no where near the $10 billion he says he is.

    To understand why, you have to see how I get there.

    First, let’s look at take a look at the size of his true debt load. In a balance sheet unveiled on June 16th of last year, the day he announced his candidacy, Trump declared a net worth of $8.7 billion, a figure updated in the July release to “in excess of TEN BILLION DOLLARS,” the only words emblazoned in capital letters.

    The June balance sheet does list debt of $503 million, which is labeled “loans and mortgages,” a seemingly modest figure for a tycoon of his self-declared “massive” wealth. But a lot more debt is connected to his buildings than Trump is letting on. In fact, Trump is subtracting the mortgage amounts to arrive at the equity figure for some holdings. Others he is presenting at full value. But it appears that only the loans on the properties that are held at full value are making into that $503 million number.

    Take the asset category labeled “Real Properties owned less than 100% by Donald J. Trump.” The two dominant holdings there are 1290 Avenue of the Americas in Manhattan, and 555 California Street, the former Bank of America complex, in San Francisco. In both of those office holdings, Trump’s partner is Vornado Realty Trust VNO -1.75% , a highly successful REIT led by CEO Steven Roth.

    Trump gives the partnership bucket on his balance sheet a total value of $943 million, “net of debt.” How much debt? Vornado’s 10-K discloses that 1290 carries a mortgage of $950 million, and 555 is encumbered by a loan of $589 million. Trump, according to the Vornado filings, owns 30% of the two buildings. That means Trump’s share of the overall borrowings of $1.55 billion is $465 million.

    That brings Trump’s debt figure up to at least $968 million. But we’re not done yet. Trump has other loans that are lying under camouflage as well. Trump’s balance sheet also has a category label “other assets” that he’s claiming are worth $317 million. Those assets, like the partially owned buildings, are listed as “net of debt.” What is that other stuff? Trump doesn’t say but it could include such things as five airplanes, a golf production company, the rights to operate the skating rink in New York Central Park as well as the Ferry Golf course in the Bronx, and Trump Model Management. But while Trump discloses how much income he gets from these assets and a range for their worth, he doesn’t say how much he has borrowed against them, or how much he owes on other unidentified assets that may provide security for loans.

    The bigger problem is this: While Trump says that he has netted the debt out of his partially owned properties, it doesn’t appear he has. Either that or he has grossly inflated the value of the properties. The only financial statement that Trump has released—the one from June—is two years old. The value of those properties have surely increased since then. Given what real estate values have done since then, I estimate Trump’s 30% stake of the buildings to be around $1.1 billion. Subtract around $100 million for a third minority holding—his 50% share in the Trump Hotel International Hotel Las Vegas—and Trump is effectively boasting that his equity in the Vornado-Trump office towers is worth $1 billion or more.


    It’s the one thing he’s not bragging about.
    On the campaign trail, Donald Trump has said dealing with the nation’s $18 trillion debt will be easy. One reason: Trump could just choose to ignore it. That appears to be how Trump has dealt with some of the debt on his own balance sheet.

    You’d think that disclosing the total amount one owes would be an essential line item in any net worth statement, but that figure appears nowhere in Trump’s most recently released balance sheet. The Donald does list a category called “loans and mortgages,” but that number surprisingly excludes the debt Trump has on a number of buildings that he is a partial owner of, as well as debt he carries on a pile of assets that Trump says are worth over $300 million, but he just labels as “other.”

    In a previous story, I found that in public financial disclosures, Donald Trump was counting revenues from golf courses, hotel rooms, and sundry sources as “income.” Since Trump didn’t subtract salaries, utilities, maintenance and all the other routine costs, the big numbers he’s trumpeting aren’t income at all, but gross sales. Just as he was overstating his income, his financial statement appears to be understating the size of his debt. The Donald clearly believes that the public deserves no more than a murky view of his own debt picture.

    (For another look at Trump’s wealth read: A Look Inside Donald Trump’s Lavish $200 Million ‘Palace’)

    Through heavy digging, Fortune identified the loans Trump has on these other buildings that are not included on his released balance sheet. Add to the loans and mortgages he does disclose and Fortune has determined that Trump’s total debt balloons to nearly $1 billion, or about double what he specifically acknowledges he owes. And it could be even larger.


    What’s more, Trump, even though he says he isn’t, by Fortune‘s calculations appears to be ignoring debt when calculating his equity in two of his most prestigious properties that are at the heart of his commercial office portfolio. He claims that portfolio is worth $1 billion. But factor in debt and it may only be worth half of that. Put it together and you get a better picture of why Trump is likely worth no where near the $10 billion he says he is.

    To understand why, you have to see how I get there.

    First, let’s look at take a look at the size of his true debt load. In a balance sheet unveiled on June 16th of last year, the day he announced his candidacy, Trump declared a net worth of $8.7 billion, a figure updated in the July release to “in excess of TEN BILLION DOLLARS,” the only words emblazoned in capital letters.

    The June balance sheet does list debt of $503 million, which is labeled “loans and mortgages,” a seemingly modest figure for a tycoon of his self-declared “massive” wealth. But a lot more debt is connected to his buildings than Trump is letting on. In fact, Trump is subtracting the mortgage amounts to arrive at the equity figure for some holdings. Others he is presenting at full value. But it appears that only the loans on the properties that are held at full value are making into that $503 million number.

    Take the asset category labeled “Real Properties owned less than 100% by Donald J. Trump.” The two dominant holdings there are 1290 Avenue of the Americas in Manhattan, and 555 California Street, the former Bank of America complex, in San Francisco. In both of those office holdings, Trump’s partner is Vornado Realty Trust VNO -1.75% , a highly successful REIT led by CEO Steven Roth.

    Trump gives the partnership bucket on his balance sheet a total value of $943 million, “net of debt.” How much debt? Vornado’s 10-K discloses that 1290 carries a mortgage of $950 million, and 555 is encumbered by a loan of $589 million. Trump, according to the Vornado filings, owns 30% of the two buildings. That means Trump’s share of the overall borrowings of $1.55 billion is $465 million.

    That brings Trump’s debt figure up to at least $968 million. But we’re not done yet. Trump has other loans that are lying under camouflage as well. Trump’s balance sheet also has a category label “other assets” that he’s claiming are worth $317 million. Those assets, like the partially owned buildings, are listed as “net of debt.” What is that other stuff? Trump doesn’t say but it could include such things as five airplanes, a golf production company, the rights to operate the skating rink in New York Central Park as well as the Ferry Golf course in the Bronx, and Trump Model Management. But while Trump discloses how much income he gets from these assets and a range for their worth, he doesn’t say how much he has borrowed against them, or how much he owes on other unidentified assets that may provide security for loans.

    The bigger problem is this: While Trump says that he has netted the debt out of his partially owned properties, it doesn’t appear he has. Either that or he has grossly inflated the value of the properties. The only financial statement that Trump has released—the one from June—is two years old. The value of those properties have surely increased since then. Given what real estate values have done since then, I estimate Trump’s 30% stake of the buildings to be around $1.1 billion. Subtract around $100 million for a third minority holding—his 50% share in the Trump Hotel International Hotel Las Vegas—and Trump is effectively boasting that his equity in the Vornado-Trump office towers is worth $1 billion or more.



    Indeed, his share of these two high-rises would be worth $1 billion—if it they didn’t have big mortgages. Top tenants occupy 2.1 million feet of space in 1290 Avenue of the Americas, and 1.8m million at 555 California, and according to Vornado’s 10-K, both are getting $65 to $70 a foot in rent. By Fortune’s estimates, their market values, pre-debt, are around $1.6 billion for 1290, and $1.5 billion for 555. So Trump’s 30% share of that combined $3.1 billion is around $930 million. Add the $100 million or so from the Las Vegas hotel, and we arrive at a sum approaching what Trump declares for his partnership properties.

    But that’s before subtracting mortgage debt. Nor does Trump’s share in the cash flow generated by these holdings support his claim of a $10 billion-plus net worth. In the 10-K, Vornado states that its share in the EBITDA from 555 is $49.975 million. Hence, Trump’s share is just over $21 million. Deduct his portion of the interest expense—the rate on the $589 million loan is 3.34%—as well as his pro-rata contribution to capital expenditures for upkeep, and he probably nets around $9 million a year. Running the same calculation for 1290, Trump’s share of the cash flow would come to about $10 million. And that’s before taxes, making the real net a mystery, since Donald may prove the only nominee in modern history not to release his tax returns.

    The two Vornado-Trump towers account for more than one-third of Trump’s portfolio of office and retail space, and produce much bigger rents than his largest building, 40 Wall Street. So a major bulwark of his empire is generating only around $20 million in pre-tax, free cash flow. Any observer who knows numbers would expect a billionaire worth “in excess of $10 billion” to be collecting around $500 million before taxes. Trump surely has plenty of real income beyond that $20 million, but given the importance of the partnership properties, it’s hard to see how his total income, as normally defined, gets beyond $100 million, let alone five-times that number.

    If he becomes president, Trump’s biggest challenge could be tackling the debt explosion looming just a few years away. Although Trump doesn’t appear in any peril from over-borrowing, his lack of disclosure on his loans suggests he won’t exactly dig into identifying the danger zones as America’s outlays rapidly outstrip its revenues. It would be great if a potential president also had excellent business sense, displaying a sober mastery of numbers and an attention to detail, who could determine and explain what’s required to rein in future deficits. What America needs isn’t a promoter but a fiscal pragmatist, and that isn’t Donald Trump.

    http://fortune.com/2016/03/23/donald-trump-debt/

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    Re: Fox News announces candidate line-up for prime-time debate

    Trump’s Empire: A Maze of Debts and Opaque Ties
    By SUSANNE CRAIGAUG. 20, 2016

    http://www.nytimes.com/2016/08/21/us...debt.html?_r=0

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    Re: Fox News announces candidate line-up for prime-time debate

    Last night, after a quick visit to Mexico where he met with President Enrique Pena Nieto, Donald Trump gave his promised speech on immigration. The following link promises the live speech.

    http://www.nbcnews.com/video/watch-l...h-755483203822

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    Re: Fox News announces candidate line-up for prime-time debate

    Fact Check: Trump on Immigration
    By ERICA WERNER AND NICHOLAS RICCARDI, ASSOCIATED PRESS WASHINGTON Sep 1, 2016, 3:46 AM ET

    Wednesday was supposed to be the day Donald Trump clarified his immigration stance. But in a key speech on that subject, he misstated facts about immigration policy, life for those in the country illegally and their impact on the U.S. economy.

    A look at some of his statements in an Arizona rally in the evening and after a meeting earlier in the day with Mexico's president:



    TRUMP: "President Obama and Hillary Clinton have engaged in gross dereliction of duty by surrendering the safety of the American people to open borders."

    THE FACTS: Trump actually praised President Barack Obama in the past for deporting an unprecedented number of people during his first term, a record that does not square with an accusation of supporting an "open" border.

    Obama increased Border Patrol staffing to an all-time high of 21,444 agents in 2011 and his administration has virtually ended the practice of "voluntary returns," or turning back Mexicans without any consequences.

    Both Obama and Clinton support a more lenient policy than Trump has proposed, but what they lay out is not an open border.

    Clinton has promised to extend Obama's actions that would let people brought to the country illegally as children remain in the country, as well as to let some parents of U.S. citizens stay. Both seek legislation that would allow most of the estimated 11 million immigrants in the country illegally to stay if they pass a background check, learn English and pay taxes. However, those who fail the background check or commit crimes would be deported.



    TRUMP, on people illegally in the U.S.: "They're treated better than our vets."

    THE FACTS: People in the country illegally do not have the right to work, vote or receive most government benefits. A modest number have been exempted from deportation because of an Obama administration action but most live under the risk of being removed from the country.

    Veterans are guaranteed government health care and because almost all are citizens, the right to vote and other government benefits.

    The quality of their care has been criticized by Trump and others but people in the country illegally do not have equivalent rights to health care, except for emergency treatment. Public hospitals are required to provide emergency medical care regardless of immigration status.



    TRUMP: "When politicians talk about immigration reform they usually mean the following: amnesty, open borders, lower wages ... It should mean improvements to our laws and policies to make life better for American citizens."

    THE FACTS: No politician of either party who supports overhauling immigration laws supports "amnesty," but the meaning of "amnesty" varies depending on who is talking.

    The sweeping and bipartisan immigration bill that passed the Senate in 2013 was derided by opponents as amnesty, but supporters including GOP Sen. Marco Rubio of Florida disputed that, noting numerous requirements imposed on immigrants in the country illegally along a 13-year path to citizenship, including paying penalties.

    The bill proposed spending tens of billions of dollars to double the number of U.S. Border Patrol agents and greatly increase border security. And the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office studied the bill and projected that it would lower wages for the entire workforce slightly over the first 10 years after becoming law, but would then increase wages for the entire workforce by even more, at the same time boosting economic output and increasing the GDP.



    TRUMP, on the number of people in the U.S. illegally: "Our government has no idea. It could be 3 million, it could be 30 million. They have no idea."

    THE FACTS: The government actually has an idea. The Homeland Security Department estimates there are 11.4 million people in the United States illegally. Few in the immigration debate challenge that estimate.

    The figure comes from an analysis of the most recent Census Data. The government compares the number of people whom the Census reports as foreign-born with the number of people who have been admitted legally and gained citizenship. The most recent estimate dates to January 2012. It roughly matches the estimates of demographers from the Pew Foundation, which issues its estimates more rapidly than the government.

    Experts believe the number of people in the U.S. illegally has been steadily declining as Mexicans and others return to their home country and illegal border crossings dwindle.



    TRUMP, on ending the practice of releasing people who are caught crossing the border illegally, pending a court appearance: "We are going to end catch-and-release ... Under my administration, anyone who illegally crosses the border will be detained until they are removed out of our country and back to the country from which they came."

    THE FACTS: Many of the releases in question were ordered by courts. They were not a policy of the Obama administration.

    A federal judge in Los Angeles ruled last year the federal government's detention of children and their mothers who were caught crossing the border illegally violated a 1997 court settlement. In July, an appeals court narrowed the scope, saying children must be quickly released but not their parents. From October through July, 48,311 unaccompanied children were arrested crossing the border from Mexico; many more children were caught with their families.

    Many crossing the border illegally claim asylum, which must be adjudicated by an immigration judge. People can claim asylum because they are being persecuted or fear persecution on grounds of race, religion, nationality, membership in a social group or political opinion.



    TRUMP, on preventing people from overstaying their visas and remaining in the country illegally: "We will finally complete the biometric entry-exit visa tracking system, which we need desperately. For years Congress has required biometric entry-exit visa tracking systems but it has never been completed. The politicians are all talk, no action. Never happens, never happens ... In my administration we will ensure that this system is in place."

    THE FACTS: Trump is correct in focusing on visa overstays as a source of much illegal immigration. The biometric system he wants to complete, though, presents enormous logistical, technical and financial challenges, and he gave no details how he would address it differently than his predecessors.

    Congress mandated the system first in 1996 and only now has the Obama administration begun implementing it on select flights at nine airports and at a border crossing between San Diego and Tijuana, Mexico.

    The scope of the problem is immense - and not one that Trump's proposed border wall could fix.

    The U.S. admits more than 45 million people annually on tourist, student and work visas. The government says 99 percent of them leave when required. But 1 percent overstay their visas, and that's more than 450,000 people annually.



    TRUMP, after meeting Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto: "I shared my strong view that NAFTA has been a far greater benefit to Mexico than it has been to the United States and that it must be improved upon. ... I expressed that ... we must take action to stem this tremendous outflow of jobs from our country. It's happening every day, it's getting worse and worse and worse, and we have to stop it."

    THE FACTS: The loss of manufacturing jobs is generally attributed to China, not Mexico.

    Some U.S. companies have moved jobs to Mexico the Carrier Corp. recently decided to relocate an air conditioning factory there from Indiana. But there is little data to show that the trend is getting "worse and worse."

    No reliable annual measures exist of job flows between the U.S. and Mexico. The United States hemorrhaged manufacturing jobs from 2000 to 2010, when more than 5.5 million were lost, but most economists blame the emergence of China as a manufacturing powerhouse and the increasing automation of many factories.

    Recently, manufacturing has done a bit better: Since 2010, U.S. manufacturing jobs have increased by about 900,000. And many economists credit NAFTA with helping the U.S. auto industry by providing a cheap source of parts that otherwise might have been sourced in China. A report by the Center for Economic and Policy Research argued that imports of subsidized U.S. agricultural products put as many as 2 million Mexican farmers out of work. And since NAFTA's implementation in 1994, Mexico has grown more slowly than many of its Latin American counterparts.



    TRUMP: "We didn't discuss that. We didn't discuss who pays for the wall, we didn't discuss." ... "We did discuss the wall. We didn't discuss payment of the wall. That'll be for a later date."

    PENA NIETO on Twitter, in Spanish: "At the beginning of the conversation with Donald Trump I made it clear that Mexico will not pay for the wall."

    THE FACTS: The facts may depend on what your definition of a discussion is. If the Mexican president opened with a comment that his country won't pay for the wall and Trump did not respond to it, that may not have been a discussion in his mind. But the subject, it seems, came up. The Trump campaign's brief statement on the meeting did not quibble with Pena Nieto's account. It said the meeting "was not a negotiation."

    http://abcnews.go.com/Politics/wireS...ation-41791473

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    Re: Fox News announces candidate line-up for prime-time debate

    Mexican president disputes Trump over border wall payment discussion

    (CNN)Donald Trump flew into a nation he has constantly berated during his campaign to meet President Enrique Peña Nieto and said they discussed a wall Trump has vowed to build on the US southern border, but not his demand that Mexico pay for it -- an assertion the Mexican president later disputed.

    "Who pays for the wall? We didn't discuss," Trump had said when asked by a reporter during a news conference following their meeting in Mexico City. "We did discuss the wall. We didn't discuss payment of the wall. That'll be for a later date."
    But Peña Nieto later claimed the two had discussed the wall and who would pay for it -- and he had "made it clear" to Trump it wouldn't be Mexico.
    "At the start of the conversation with Donald Trump, I made it clear that Mexico will not pay for the wall," Peña Nieto tweeted, after their meeting Wednesday.

    He added that his conversation with the Republican nominee then moved on to other topics in a respectful fashion.
    Jason Miller, Trump's senior communications adviser, called the meeting "the first part of the discussion and a relationship builder" between the two men, after Peña Nieto tweeted.
    "It was not a negotiation, and that would have been inappropriate. It is unsurprising that they hold two different views on this issue, and we look forward to continuing the conversation," he said in a statement.
    In subsequent interviews in Mexico, Peña Nieto reiterated his version of events. He told CNN affiliate Televisa in an interview late Wednesday some of the positions Trump has taken "are a threat to Mexico."
    He also told the outlet he was very clear with Trump about the subject of a wall at the border and insisted Mexico would not pay for it and he made Trump aware that the people of Mexico had been "very insulted."
    Peña Nieto, speaking alongside Trump during their joint appearance, twice stressed the "responsibility" he has to defend Mexican people around the world and said Trump has made "assertions that regrettably had hurt and have affected Mexicans."
    "The Mexican people have felt hurt by the comments that have been made. But I am sure that his genuine interest is to build a relationship that will give both of our society's better welfare," Peña Nieto said.
    Trump apparently left his tough deal-making persona at home as he received a presidential-style news conference on foreign soil while on a high-risk trip to Mexico on Wednesday.

    Read the full article here: http://www.cnn.com/2016/08/30/politi...-nieto-mexico/

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    Re: Fox News announces candidate line-up for prime-time debate

    Kurtis Lee
    Several of Donald Trump's Latino advisors resign after his immigration speech

    Donald Trump has held photo ops with his National Hispanic Advisory Council and in recent weeks boasted about his increasing support from this crucial voting demographic.

    But that was before his speech on immigration this week.

    On Thursday, several who sit on the council announced their resignation, citing Trump's refusal to truly listen to their views on immigration reform.

    Jacob Monty, a Houston-based immigration lawyer who was a member of the council, said in a Facebook post that he gave Trump a plan that would "improve border security, remove hardened criminal aliens and most importantly, give work authority to millions of honest, hard-working immigrants" in the country.

    "He rejected that," wrote Monty, announcing his resignation from the council after Trump's speech. "So I must reject him."

    In his immigration address Wednesday, Trump put forward several hard-line proposals, including new limits and entry criteria for legal immigrants, while also reaffirming a pledge to deny legal status to anyone who remains in the country illegally.

    CBS News reported Thursday that 15 of nearly two dozen members on the council had resigned.

    Ramiro Pena, a Texas pastor on the council, told Politico that Trump's speech had potentially cost him the election. Pena added that he'd have to reconsider being part of a "scam."

    Alfonso Aguilar, who oversees Latino Partnership for Conservative Principles, is not on the council but was another prominent surrogate of Trump's who backed off his support Thursday.

    “For the last two months, he said he was not going to deport people without criminal records," Aguilar said on CNN. "And then we heard yesterday, and I was totally disappointed — not surprised, but disappointed — and slightly misled, because he gave the impression and the campaign gave the impression until yesterday morning that he was going to deal with the undocumented in a compassionate way.”

    Trump's remarks came after he visited Mexico earlier in the day, offering subdued remarks alongside the country’s president. During the visit, Trump noted that he has "tremendous feeling for Mexican Americans."

    The comments, a clear shift in tone, were far from his invective this election cycle when he denounced Mexican immigrants as "rapists" and drug runners in his first campaign speech

    Last month, Trump held a roundtable meeting with members of the council, where they discussed creating jobs and the Republican presidential nominee's plans on immigration.

    Among those who attended was Colorado state Rep. Clarice Navarro, who said she left feeling optimistic about Trump.

    "I've always felt he does care about the Latino community, and now it's on us to get him elected," she said at the time.

    On Thursday, she could not be reached for comment.

    Florida Pastor Alberto Delgado said on MSNBC he would remain a member of the council.

    “This is the plan he has, so we have to work with what he has and we must try soften that projection,” he said in reference to Trump's combative tone.

    Updated at 12:48 p.m.: This post was updated with additional comments.

    http://www.latimes.com/nation/politi...htmlstory.html

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    Re: Fox News announces candidate line-up for prime-time debate

    The Trump Campaign Just Hired a Notorious Clinton Antagonist
    Trump's new deputy campaign manager has been trying to destroy Hillary Clinton for three decades.

    STEPHANIE MENCIMER SEP. 2, 2016 2:46 PM



    Donald Trump with his new deputy campaign manager, David Bossie, at last year's Freedom Summit in Greenville, South Carolina. AP Photo/Rainier Ehrhardt
    David Bossie has devoted his career to bringing down the Clintonsand Donald Trump just hired him to help run his campaign.

    There's no one in Washington (and perhaps the world) with a more encyclopedic knowledge of every Clinton scandal and conspiracy theory. Bossie, who will serve as Trump's deputy campaign manager, first made a name for himself during Bill Clinton's presidency, when he served as the chief investigator for the House committee that probed the Whitewater scandal and numerous other alleged Clinton misdeeds. Bossie was eventually fired from the committee for his overzealousness, and he went on to run a conservative nonprofit group called Citizens United, where he continued to amass an enormous opposition research file on the Clintons. Now Trump has finally given him a platform to launch his assault.

    Bossie got his start working for the master of political dark arts, Floyd Brown, a political operative famous for creating the racially charged Willie Horton ad that helped obliterate the presidential hopes of Michael Dukakis in 1988. According to CBS, during the 1992 presidential campaign, Brown was running an independent political committee supporting George H.W. Bush. That year, he sent the young Bossie to investigate rumors about one of Bill Clinton's alleged mistresses, who supposedly committed suicide in the 1970s after an affair with Clinton left her pregnant. Bossie allegedly tailed the woman's mother and followed her to an Army hospital where her husband was recovering from a stroke. CBS reported that Bossie "burst into the sick man's room and began questioning the shaken mother about her daughter's suicide."

    Such tactics didn't earn Bossie any fans in the Bush campaign, which filed a complaint against Brown's operation with the Federal Elections Commission. But Bossie's no-holds-barred methods were embraced by the Republican members of the Newt Gingrich-era House of Representatives, who were gung ho to investigate the Clintons. Bossie was hired as an investigator by Rep. Dan Burton (R-Ind.), the chairman of the House Government Oversight and Reform Committee. Burton and his committee spent years launching quixotic probes targeting the Clintons, at one point even investigating the conspiracy theory that deputy White House counsel Vince Foster had been murdered by the Clintons.

    Bossie was eventually fired from the committee for releasing selectively edited jailhouse phone recordings of former US associate attorney general Webster Hubbell, who had worked with Hillary Clinton at the Rose Law Firm in Little Rock, Arkansas, and been sent to prison for tax fraud related to his work there. But Bossie continued to investigate the Clintons from his new perch at Citizens United, which Brown founded in 1988. In 2008, during Hillary Clinton's first presidential run, Bossie plowed his years of oppo digging into a film attacking her. That film ultimately led to the Supreme Court decision Citizens United v. FEC, in which the court eliminated restrictions on corporate money flowing into the political system.

    In the ensuing controversy over the Supreme Court decision and its effect on campaign finance, the film that spawned the ruling has been largely overlooked, but it's a useful window into the type of mudslinging that Bossie can do for the Trump campaign. Hillary: The Movie was a political hit piece, rife with the wacky and paranoid conspiracy theories that have long characterized Bossie's work. (At one point, the film suggests that the Clintons whacked the cat of one of Bill's alleged former mistresses.) But it also features several forgotten Clinton scandals that should probably be given a second look now that Hillary is running for president.

    I saw the film at its Georgetown premier in 2008, at an event headlined by Bossie himself. Here's what I wrote afterward:

    Hillary makes great use of the video footage from the 2000 "Hollywood Farewell Gala Salute to William Jefferson Clinton." The star-studded event was organized and paid for by Peter F. Paul, a repeat felon and con artist who had cozied up to the Clintons in the waning days of the administration. Aiding him was Aaron Tonken, another con man who was later convicted of defrauding charities, who helpfully provides an interview for the film from prison.

    Paul, who is interviewed extensively in the movie, paid $1.2 million to put on the gala, which raised money for Hillary Clinton's Senate race. Her Senate campaign, however, reported to the Federal Election Commission that the event only cost $523,000. (In-kind donations such as hosting a party count toward candidate spending limits.) The FEC eventually fined Clinton's campaign $35,000 for underreporting the cost of the party. Hillary Clinton's finance director was tried and acquitted for his role in reporting the event cost.

    After the Washington Post reported on Paul's criminal history, which included drug charges and all sorts of financial shenanigans (even defrauding Cuba, if you can imagine the level of criminal ingenuity that would entail), Hillary Clinton distanced herself from him. But Hillary showcases lots of footage and chummy photos of the former first lady with Paul, even a video of a conference call she made to him. All this suggests a close relationship that's going to be tough to avoid addressing if she ends up facing off with a Republican next fall.

    The criminal past that makes Paul a problem for Clinton also makes him a problem for the filmmakers. To address this issue, Citizens United hired a professional polygrapher to administer a lie-detector test to Paul on film, which of course he passes. It's a laughable scene, and it's tempting to dismiss the guy's story, except that a lot of it is true. The Clintons have still never explained how they hooked up with Paul. As Paul points out in the film, his house was prepared for presidential visits, and he also visited the White House on several occasions, so it's hard to believe that the Clintons didn't know he was a crook long before the gala. You don't need to be James Carville to see how the episode may play out in campaign ads next summer.

    Those ads never got made because Hillary Clinton lost the Democratic primary to Barack Obama. This cycle, Bossie has been running the Defeat Crooked Hillary Super PAC, where he has attacked Clinton from the sidelines. But with his elevation to the Trump campaign, he can deploy his treasure trove of Clinton dirt directly. Whether Bossie can behave himself and avoid becoming part of the story remains to be seen. Trump often says he hires only the best peopleand in this case, it's true. As a political hit man, Bossie is the best there is.

    http://www.motherjones.com/politics/...r-david-bossie

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    Re: Fox News announces candidate line-up for prime-time debate

    Leaked Script Shows What Advisers Want Donald Trump to Say at Black Church
    By YAMICHE ALCINDORSEPT. 1, 2016

    DETROIT — Donald J. Trump’s visit to a black church here on Saturday will be a major moment for a candidate with a history of offending the sensibilities of black Americans.

    His team was leaving nothing to chance.

    Instead of speaking to the congregation at Great Faith Ministries International, Mr. Trump had planned to be interviewed by its pastor in a session that would be closed to the public and the news media, with questions submitted in advance. And instead of letting Mr. Trump be his freewheeling self, his campaign prepared lengthy answers for the submitted questions, consulting black Republicans to make sure he says the right things.

    An eight-page draft script obtained by The New York Times shows 12 questions that Bishop Wayne T. Jackson, the pastor, intends to ask Mr. Trump in the taped question-and-answer session, as well as the responses Mr. Trump is being advised to give.

    The proposed answers were devised by aides working for the Trump campaign and the Republican National Committee, according to an official who has been involved in the planning but declined to be identified while speaking about confidential strategy.

    The document includes the exact wording of answers the aides are proposing for Mr. Trump to give to questions about police killings, racial tension and the perception among many black voters that he and the Republican Party are racist, among other topics.

    The official said the answers could change based on feedback from the black Republicans they are consulting with.

    After this article was published online Thursday night, Jason Miller, the senior communications adviser for the Trump campaign, said that Mr. Trump’s plans had changed and that he would address the congregation for five to 10 minutes after the interview. Mr. Trump will then visit neighborhoods with Ben Carson, a onetime campaign rival, who supports Mr. Trump and grew up in Detroit.

    “If you know anything about Mr. Trump, it’s that he will want the opportunity to take his vision and message of opportunity directly to the people on Saturday,” Mr. Miller said.

    It is not uncommon for a candidate to request interview questions in advance; aides to Hillary Clinton do it from time to time. But it is unusual for a campaign to go so far as to prepare a script for a candidate’s own responses, and highlights the sensitivity of Mr. Trump’s first appearance at a black church. A series of slights, including his questioning of President Obama’s birth certificate, has not endeared him to black voters.

    The interview will air about a week later on the Impact Network, Bishop Jackson’s Christian cable TV channel. The official said several Trump aides would work with the network to edit the taped interview so that the final version reflected the campaign’s wishes. (On Thursday night, Mr. Miller said the campaign would not edit the interview.)

    The arrangements had angered several black Republicans, who urged Mr. Trump, widely seen as distant from the black community, to speak for at least 10 minutes at the service, the official involved in the planning said. The official added that the campaign had been uncomfortable with Mr. Trump’s speaking before the congregation and had insisted on a private interview.

    On Thursday night, the campaign said Mr. Trump would indeed address the congregation for a few minutes and would spend a half-hour casually speaking with church members individually.

    Mr. Trump is well known for veering from prepared remarks or throwing them away entirely. That could happen on Saturday: Many of the answers being prepared for him do not sound much like Mr. Trump as his usual self.

    When asked about his vision for black Americans, the script suggests that Mr. Trump stay positive, advising that he use lines such as “If we are to make America great again, we must reduce, rather than highlight, issues of race in this country” and “I want to make race disappear as a factor in government and governance.”

    To a question submitted by Bishop Jackson about whether his campaign is racist, the script suggests that Mr. Trump avoid repeating the word, and instead speak about improving education and getting people off welfare and back to work. “The proof, as they say, will be in the pudding,” Mr. Trump is advised to say. “Coming into a community is meaningless unless we offer an alternative to the horrible progressive agenda that has perpetuated a permanent underclass in America.”

    To the first question, “Are you a Christian and do you believe the Bible is an inspired word of God?” the scriptwriters have a response they hope will keep Mr. Trump from repeating previous stumbles when asked about his faith.

    “As I went through my life, things got busy with business, but my family kept me grounded to the truth and the word of God,” the script has Mr. Trump saying. “I treasure my relationship with my family, and through them, I have a strong faith enriched by an ever-wonderful God.”

    Bishop Jackson said Thursday that he saw no problem with the campaign’s asking to screen his questions, and noted that in the past he had given advance text of prayers he planned to deliver at the White House. “We want this to be as peaceful as possible,” he said. “That’s what I promised would happen. I promised that: You are coming into a place to be interviewed and we don’t want anybody to be hurt or anybody to be misused, so that’s it.”

    Of all the proposed answers, the most Trump-like might be his reply to the final question of the interview: What he would say to undecided black voters?

    “If you want a strong partner in this journey, you will vote for me. I will never let you down,” Mr. Trump is directed to say, adding, “By the way, my support is now up to 8 percent and climbing.”

    http://www.nytimes.com/2016/09/02/us...e-jackson.html

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    Re: Fox News announces candidate line-up for prime-time debate

    Billionaire GOP Donor Wants Trump's Head Checked
    A Cuban American from South Florida who has poured millions into Republican causes slams Trump and endorses Clinton. RUSS CHOMASEP. 1, 2016 12:14 PM



    Evan Vucci/AP
    Mike Fernandez has spent more than $4 million in the last four years supporting Republican candidates for national office. He gave $1 million to a super-PAC backing Mitt Romney in 2012 and more than $3 million to one supporting Jeb Bush's presidential run this year. He also made a donation to help Scott Walker pay off his campaign debt and contributed to America Rising, a super-PAC set up by the GOP to attack Democrats. Of all the people who have donated money this election, he's the 31st-biggest donor. And he wants someone to check Donald Trump's head.

    "As a Republican who has contributed millions of dollars to the party's causes, I ask: Why has our party not sought a psychological evaluation of its nominee?" Fernandez writes in an op-ed published in the Miami Herald on Thursday.

    Under the headline "I'm a Republican and I'm With Hillary Clinton," Fernandez attacks Trump as responsible for "a neverending spiral of vulgarity, intellectual dishonesty, invective, abuse, misogyny, racism, intolerance, bullying, ignorance and downright cruelty." Fernandez says he takes particular issue with the way Trump has implied that if he loses, it will be because Clinton cheated.



    Evan Vucci/AP
    Mike Fernandez has spent more than $4 million in the last four years supporting Republican candidates for national office. He gave $1 million to a super-PAC backing Mitt Romney in 2012 and more than $3 million to one supporting Jeb Bush's presidential run this year. He also made a donation to help Scott Walker pay off his campaign debt and contributed to America Rising, a super-PAC set up by the GOP to attack Democrats. Of all the people who have donated money this election, he's the 31st-biggest donor. And he wants someone to check Donald Trump's head.

    "As a Republican who has contributed millions of dollars to the party's causes, I ask: Why has our party not sought a psychological evaluation of its nominee?" Fernandez writes in an op-ed published in the Miami Herald on Thursday.

    Under the headline "I'm a Republican and I'm With Hillary Clinton," Fernandez attacks Trump as responsible for "a neverending spiral of vulgarity, intellectual dishonesty, invective, abuse, misogyny, racism, intolerance, bullying, ignorance and downright cruelty." Fernandez says he takes particular issue with the way Trump has implied that if he loses, it will be because Clinton cheated.

    ADVERTISING


    "This is insanity and dictatorial machinations at best," Fernandez writes.

    Fernandez is not just a big donor on the national level. He's also an important cog in the Cuban American political machine in Florida. Born in Cuba, Fernandez made more than $1 billion investing in a string of health insurance companies. He has been active in the policy debate on normalizing relations with the Castro regime and traveled with Barack Obama on the president's trip to Havana earlier this year, but he's hardly a friend of the president and has criticized Obamacare. Fernandez donated $1 million to a super-PAC backing Florida Gov. Rick Scott, who has endorsed Trump, and he chaired Scott's fundraising effort. Over the last five years, he has donated at least $655,000 to the Florida Republican Party.

    In his op-ed, Fernandez makes clear he is not a Democrat, just anti-Trump. He urges Florida Republicans to vote for Clinton but to select Republican candidates elsewhere on the ballot. Fernandez does have a history with Trump. Last December, Fernandez took out an ad in the Herald calling Trump a "#BULLYionaire" and comparing him to Adolf Hitler and Benito Mussolini (leading to an angry letter from Trump's lawyer). In July, he attempted to buy an ad in the Cleveland Plain-Dealer, timed to coincide with the Republican National Convention, in which he compared Trump to a scorpion that could drown the party (a reference to an old animal fable). The paper said it would publish the ad only if Fernandez removed Trump's name from it, which he declined to do.

    http://www.motherjones.com/politics/...s-head-checked

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