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  1. #11
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    Re: How I Became a Part-Time Vegetarian

    Wow! That is cheap!!!
    To put it into context-$103,500 WAS the average deposit you needed to buy a home in the UK last June.
    You can get houses for that money-but there is often no work nearby or the house needs lots of modernising and is in a very run down area.
    In London you would be very lucky to buy a garage to keep your car in at that money!

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    Susana (22-01-16)

  3. #12
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    Re: How I Became a Part-Time Vegetarian

    It would be considered very cheap in lots of places here, also. California or New York City, for example. Even compared to Santa Fe, New Mexico it is very cheap, and overall I think the U.S. is a lot less expensive to live in than many countries. So yes, it is under consideration. If not this place, then another similar one.

    It must have good outdoor space. No one goes to Arizona in the winter and sits indoors all the time! A fireplace is a good thing, too.
    Last edited by Susana; 23-01-16 at 12:11 AM. Reason: added something

  4. #13
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    Re: How I Became a Part-Time Vegetarian

    So-you going to go down for a viewing -subject to The Blizzard? If not hope you find somewhere warm for winters soon!
    Just thankful we get nothing like some of the east coast USA winters. Quite lucky where I live-we rarely get snow where other parts of the country always get it if it is around-just as well I hate the stuff!

  5. #14
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    Re: How I Became a Part-Time Vegetarian

    I'm not fond of snow either. It may look good on Christmas cards, but that's about it! I like where I live in summertime when I can get out and do things in the yard and participate in community activities. I want to be as active in winter as I am in summer, and that requires a change.

    I'm going as soon as I can get there! A couple of things need to come first. The most important is that my husband has to have a medical procedure, and he is waiting on the Veteran's Administration to schedule it. A lot depends on how this procedure goes. Sounds ominous, and it is.

    In the meantime I'll continue my research.

  6. #15
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    Re: How I Became a Part-Time Vegetarian

    Best wishes to you both on all counts.

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    Susana (23-01-16)

  8. #16
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    Re: How I Became a Part-Time Vegetarian

    I can relate with Richard very much. I, too, am a quasi-vegetarian. I started to become one when my sister became sick and needed special diet. Her meals were mainly composed of vegetables and fruits, which appealed to my palate, too. It's then when I realized that it's not very hard to drop red meat from my daily intake, though it requires some planning to stick to that kind of diet. Planning, in the sense that to follow my eating regimen, I often pack home-cooked lunches to take to work since my office cafeteria has a limited menu.

    But like Richard, I also haven't completely abandoned 'unhealthy foods'. I sometimes find myself in a situation where there's not much choice, like when I am a guest and the hosts have not provided for my diet restrictions. I avoid to be a fussy guest, and so I take what's offered. Especially during field trips, popular fast food chains become convenient dining places. They abound everywhere. However, I keep in mind a suggestion given by my dietitian when eating in fast food restaurants. She said that generally speaking, cheaper items in the menu are less evil.

    On a typical day you can find me thriving on fish, veggies, (little) chicken and lots of fruit. On special occasions I might indulge on more sinful choices, like steak. But this will immediately be followed by some kind of detox diet.(There's a price for everything!) My present lifestyle is far from perfectly healthful, but it suits me fine.

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    Khun Don (23-01-16), Susana (23-01-16)

  10. #17
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    Re: How I Became a Part-Time Vegetarian

    Quote Originally Posted by Susana View Post
    No matter how we choose to nourish and fuel our bodies, I think we need to be aware of how those foods are produced. Also, paying attention to how we feel after eating a particular food will definitely help us make healthier choices.
    From the health point, I think with cooking yourself and don't eat industry made food (Pizza Hut, McDonalds, etc etc ready to eat supermarket food. Also many restaurants buy pre-made food) already 80 % is done.
    The rest is just avoiding sugar, cheap oils, big amounts of alcohol, etc.. Cooking myself also keeps me very slim, because a ) I am too lazy so I rather don't eat and b ) the taste of things I cook is so boring that for sure no one will overeat on it

    I see what my staff eats....breakfast: 7/11....lunch 7/11...between an ice-cream from that motorbike seller and an iced coffee or coke (7/11) and 3 in 1 coffee. We tried to give them a cooking place in the company, but they didn't really like it.

    I estimate they eat more sugar in 1 day than I do in 1 month and I see them "grow" (but not in length). Than the girls eat diet pills. I am sad when I watch them....but I'm not their father and they are old enough.....

  11. #18
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    Re: How I Became a Part-Time Vegetarian

    Quote Originally Posted by Susana View Post
    Thank you. Living in the country I tend to keep a well stocked pantry. Fortunately we have a whole house generator as well as a fireplace with gas logs.

    Loss of wifi, however, would be tragic!
    Don't forget to stock wine and beer
    When we were flooded 1 month in Bangkok 2011 the water stock last 6+ month. We still have the pasta from 2011 (deep freeze so it doesn't rot). But the stock of beer was finished in 1 week
    Sitting in the second floor with nothing to do....what you do? Open a can of beer....

  12. #19
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    Re: How I Became a Part-Time Vegetarian

    H90, I agree with you on cooking at home. I know it must be a challenge in Bangkok where yummy street food is so cheap and readily available. My personal temptation would be noodles at lunch time. I remember my first lunch in Thailand. Previous days we had been out exploring the city and always stopped for a meal when we were hungry. My first day when I was home all day I made a sandwich around 11 am. I have always been hungry early. No one told me that we would go to a noodle shop just a few steps outside the door, if I would just wait. So I ate my sandwich and within the hour everyone else was ready to go to the noodle shop. I ate, of course, feeling guilty and spoiled since I was not in the habit of eating away from home unless it was necessary. I was hooked on first bite! However, I didn't like sugar in my noodles, and am allergic to msg so I learned to say mai sai namtam, my sai msg, noi kha. They were almost my first words in Thai, and I used them often!

    So if I were to live in Thailand again, which is highly unlikely, I would cook at home, except for noodle shop visits, and occasional street snacks. I really miss going to market and seeing such an array of fresh fruit.

  13. #20
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    Re: How I Became a Part-Time Vegetarian

    Quote Originally Posted by Susana View Post
    H90, I agree with you on cooking at home. I know it must be a challenge in Bangkok where yummy street food is so cheap and readily available. My personal temptation would be noodles at lunch time. I remember my first lunch in Thailand. Previous days we had been out exploring the city and always stopped for a meal when we were hungry. My first day when I was home all day I made a sandwich around 11 am. I have always been hungry early. No one told me that we would go to a noodle shop just a few steps outside the door, if I would just wait. So I ate my sandwich and within the hour everyone else was ready to go to the noodle shop. I ate, of course, feeling guilty and spoiled since I was not in the habit of eating away from home unless it was necessary. I was hooked on first bite! However, I didn't like sugar in my noodles, and am allergic to msg so I learned to say mai sai namtam, my sai msg, noi kha. They were almost my first words in Thai, and I used them often!

    So if I were to live in Thailand again, which is highly unlikely, I would cook at home, except for noodle shop visits, and occasional street snacks. I really miss going to market and seeing such an array of fresh fruit.
    Noodle might be good idea....Does it help if you tell no msg? My wife has a very mild problem with msg. She just feels tired after eating it. Often there is still msg even she tells "no msg". I guess pre-made food....they can't take it out.

    And very often the food "leaves" us again very quick....I guess it is the palm oil or the excess amount of it.
    BUT the situation is total different when we are in the south....there we often order food (just a phone call) and it is neither oily nor excess amounts of msg. And the meat seems better.
    (Fitting to the msg topic: my wife likes to drink lemon juice....she always tells no sugar....most of time when it comes it is sweet).
    Market: Since we had a staff with her parents farming in Bangkok I have negative feelings....She had very bad acne on her legs, she told that comes from the pesticides they put on everything and she would never eat it the vegetables themself. They farm on a different place for their own needs.
    I saw a seller spraying the flies off the meat with the normal can of insect spray.
    I read someone reporting that when the chicken farm nearby has a problem and sells chicken which died for crocodile farms, most get bought by small street food vendors.
    That might be all a very small minority but it stays in my mind so when I see the food I think of the pesticides and sick chicken and it spoils my appetite.
    I sometimes buy bananas and I always look for some that have that white animals on it (I think that aren't insects but kind of spiders) which means they didn't spray it.

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