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Songkran
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Thread: Songkran

  1. #1
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    talking

    Imagine looking out into the street and seeing total mayhem. A civil war being raged in the streets where it is brother against brother and nobody is safe. Drive-by shootings from the back of motorcycles and pick-up trucks. Huge canons being fired into crowds from the side of the road.

    Now replace the bullets and blood with water; the screams of pain with howls of joy and you have Songkran in Chiang Mai, Northern Thailand.

    For five days you cannot go outside during the day in Chiang Mai without being totally drenched. There are no taxis in Chiang Mai either, only tuk tuks and the crowds are always waiting to douse anybody they can. Everybody is fair game and people use all types of water conveying tools from simple buckets to water pistols to large canons to huge ice filled drums in the back of pick-up trucks.

    The annual death toll from Songkran is also enough to fill such a short war. The official 2003 figures were 547 killed and 35891 injured, mostly from motorbike accidents and more often than not involving alcohol.

    The origins of the water throwing derive from the age old custom of pouring water onto friends and relatives in order to bring good luck. Even today this custom is observed- not in the streets- but at home and is more widespread in the provinces. People will kneel before and pour scented water over the cupped hands of older relatives. The person receiving the water will sometimes recite a Buddhist incantation. After the water has been poured over the hands, the relative may then sprinkle some of the water onto the younger person's head to cool them. A white powder is also sometimes smeared onto the cheeks. A small amount of water can also be poured over the shoulders as a sign of respect.

    During the holiday period people visit shrines and pour water over an array of buddist statues to bring good fortune.

    There is a legend behind the Songkran festival. King Kabilprom was threatened by the charm and popularity of a man named Thammabal Kuman, whom it was reported could communicate with animals. The King summoned Kuman and posed three questions to him, announcing that if he could not answer them he would be be-headed. However if Kumom was able to answer the questions, the King would have himself be-headed. He had seven days to come up with the answers.
    Kuman easily answered the first two questions but was pondering the third under a tree when a bird whispered the answer to him. Thus the king lived up to his word to have himself be-headed. Before he did so, he asked his seven daughters to take turns in carrying his head around the world once a year so that his subjects could gaze upon it. Each daughter has her own weapon and individual power and the day that the Lunar New Year falls on determines which daughter will carry the head each year. One daughter for each day of the week.
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  2. #2
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    Nationwide safety driving campaign should be launched by now, with a lot of propaganda of safety driving tips.
    Life is short, cherish all you have and live everyday of your life the best you can. :)

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (Jerome @ Mar. 08 2005,14:52)]Songkran (pronounced Songkan)
    It's still pronounced 'Song-Kran' สงกรานต์ - only lazy and ignorance Thais not bother to put ร in it !

    (I am sorry, don't wanna be means but it is really my pet hate: Thais who deliberately pronounced and spelled wrong Thais. I suppose it confused foreigners as I can see that Jerome really believe it pronounced without ร. I admired you all who try to learn Thai language properly and feel ashame that some Thais just not bother, or even worse some Thais thought to spell and pronounce wrongly is quite fashionable.) Apologise for off topic by the way



    TK

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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (TK_onboard @ Mar. 15 2005,22:33)]- only lazy and ignorance Thais not bother to put ร in it !
    That's a little bit inflammatory isn't it?

    Actually I think I read that it was pronounced that way in The Nation a few years back.
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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]
    That's a little bit inflammatory isn't it?
    I am sorry if it sounds that way, I did not means to offend anyone.

    If it is Central/Bangkok dialect, it is definitely pronounced with ร . It is คำควบกล้ำ. Unless it is also pronounced without it in other dialect.
    TK

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