PHP Warning: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is no longer supported, use preg_replace_callback instead in ..../includes/class_bootstrap.php(433) : eval()'d code on line 110
Dining protocol
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 18

Thread: Dining protocol

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    ฮาวาย-Big Island
    Posts
    1,759
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
    If invited to eat at a Thai home, is there a protocol in eating?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    England
    Posts
    571
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Me and my wife were lucky enough to be invited to eat at a Thai home. We were just careful to use our best (Western) table manners and not put too much food on our plate at one time. I suppose we 'held back' a little so as not to appear greedy or impolite. I think that our host (our friend's mother) sensed this and personally served us with so much food, we were really full. Delicious! As for actual protocol, I don't know if there is one, but I'm sure that someone will quickly tell us if there is.
    ความพยายามอยู่ที่ไหน ความสำเร็จอยู่ที่นั่น

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    ฮาวาย-Big Island
    Posts
    1,759
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
    Ivor , I was reading a previous topic about etiquette, which answers part of my question. The other part is the order of eating. Oldest? guest? Highest on the social ladder.
    By the way nice avatar! Thanks for your reply.
    Last edited by rcalaimo; 20-10-05 at 12:45 AM.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA, USA
    Posts
    2,133
    Thanks
    794
    Thanked 640 Times in 328 Posts

    thumbs up

    I would like to add a couple of tips:

    Never eat with your fork, except to use it to push food onto your spoon.
    Eat with your right hand, especially when eating stick rice or other foods by hand.
    Life is learning. If you stop learning, you might as well be dead.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Bengalooru, India
    Posts
    1,504
    Thanks
    382
    Thanked 361 Times in 251 Posts
    Do you mean eating with the hand means we can avoid using spoons in such cases? I tried eating with my hand once in Bkk and my friend was worried for the reactions I may get. So, I returned to the spoon... which luckily is how I eat anyway. (forks hurt!)
    Never hit someone below the belt; for you are not the creator.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    England
    Posts
    571
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Hi rcalaimo.

    We always eat with our 'Thai family' each time we go to Thailand. They range in age from very young children to 62 years. We have known them for 9 years and, although me and my wife are Brits, they have accepted us as their own. It's a long story, so I won't go into it now, but we have become very familiar with each other. I think that it is because of the familiarity that I haven't noticed any protocol as to who eats first, or who sits where, etc. However, my wife and I always allow the older and similar aged members of the family to start eating before we do, out of respect. Then we join in ourselves. However, some members of the family always serve food to us also. Maybe it is their way of showing respect for us. Eating with Thai people always seems to be an amazing, unhurried, sharing experience.

    Thanks for your comment about my avatar.

    Thanks, visionchaser45, for your reminder about using the spoon or right hand to eat. It's amazing how many 'westerners' I see using their fork. It's also amusing to see some of them (myself included) try to eat noodles with chopsticks! I have never mastered them. Any tips?
    ความพยายามอยู่ที่ไหน ความสำเร็จอยู่ที่นั่น

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    England
    Posts
    571
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Hi trangram,

    I have found that it's ok to use the hand to pick up and eat things like large prawns, crab, pick chicken bones, satay, sticky rice etc. (anything that needs peeling or breaking apart). But to eat steamed rice and food like fish or meat or vegetables which is already cut into bite size pieces before it is cooked, the fork is used to push small amounts onto the spoon for eating as visionchaser45 said. Example. I love Tom Yam Goong. I take the prawn out of the soup with my spoon, then I pick it up by the tail with my right hand to eat. No problem and not frowned upon.
    ความพยายามอยู่ที่ไหน ความสำเร็จอยู่ที่นั่น

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Yangon, Myanmar
    Posts
    8,501
    Thanks
    240
    Thanked 823 Times in 463 Posts

    so happy!

    Trangam, I think eating with your hand is limited to some foods, like sticky rice, so maybe the dish you tried was not appropriate for this purpose. or if it was sticky rice, I've been told by my Bangkok friends that eating it using your hand is an "Isaan thing", which can be seen by others as lower class so they avoided doing so publicly.

    as for the chopsticks I learnt Thai style, but it turned out the Chinese don't use the chopsticks the same way, I mean they hold and move them differently. I had to learn because there were no spoons or forks when I was invited for meals. not even for cakes now I can pick nuts or even rice using chopsticks, but my style amused the Chinese all the time. next time you go to a Chinese fastfood place, try to observe how they do it, maybe that style suits you better than the Thai way

    regarding etiquette, I always read at information sites that you are supposed to leave a little bit of food at the end, to show you are not greedy, and as a sign you don't want a second helping, but actually I have never seen this happen, so it doesn't seem to be compulsory.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Rochford, Essex, England, but my heart is stil in Doilo!
    Posts
    598
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    One small point on etiquet, almost small enough to be 'nit picking', but, while in the west it is 'expected' of a well mannered person to eat, while using a spoon, to eat from the furthest side of the dish, as with eating soup etc., in Thailand you spoon from the nearest side of the dish, leaving the food on the far side as on offer to anyone that may be in need. Shows a lack of greed I am told.
    To be happy with where you are, first be happy with who you are.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    เวลส์
    Posts
    8,410
    Thanks
    1,417
    Thanked 1,930 Times in 1,180 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Betti
    Trangam, I think eating with your hand is limited to some foods, like sticky rice, so maybe the dish you tried was not appropriate for this purpose. or if it was sticky rice, I've been told by my Bangkok friends that eating it using your hand is an "Isaan thing", which can be seen by others as lower class so they avoided doing so publicly.
    I have only had two meals alone in Thailand, I met Ubonwan with 24 hours of arriving for the first time so have shared most of them with her. In all the meals we have had I have never seen her eat rice on a spoon, it is *always* with the right hand. But she is Isaan (Buri Ram).

    David
    My new travel blog: https://www.weekender.blog/

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •