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Indian food in Bangkok
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  1. #1
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    Indian food in Bangkok

    Could anyone guide me as to where to find Indian food in Bangkok?

    Geeta

  2. #2
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    Here are a couple of restaurants:

    Himali Cha Cha, 1229/11-12 Charoen Krung Soi 47/1 (New Road)
    Telephone: 02 235 1569

    Mrs. Balbir's, 155/18 Sukhumwit Soi 11 (near BTS Nana)
    Telephone 02 651-0019

    Rang Mahal, Rembrandt Hotel, 19 Sukhumwit Soi 18 (near BTS Phrom Phong)
    Telephone: 02 261 7100 ext. 7532

    On Silom Road (corner of Pan Road) there is a Hindu temple called Sri Mariamman Temple. There are quite a few Indians in that immediate area so you are sure to find Indian food there. I will try and post some more later when I get more time.

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    Mrs. Balbir's, 155/18 Sukhumwit Soi 11 (near BTS Nana)
    Telephone 02 651-0019
    Mrs. Balbir's is amazing! She makes the freshest mango lassis I've ever had...and she'll make a lassi out of any fruit you want. The food is delicious and she has cooking classes that are a lot of fun. I used to eat at her restaurant at least once a week.... and I still miss her yogurt chicken!

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    If you are the one into real vegetarian food, the one made only in a vegetarian kitchen according to the strict diet... you will find the places near Mariamman temple, as advised before.

    I once was in Bangkok with a Brahmin friend who was living on the stuff he brought from home and on some fruits and curd... and then I took him to this temple and suddenly he was surprised to find these options. One can ask the priests inside for directions, its pretty near the temple. The priests are all from one single family from Tamil Nadu, rotating every year or so.

    But frankly if above is not an issue, then thai food is real cool and some of it is quite close to South Indian food, especially a bit like Kerala food ... the coconut milk & the sweet sweet dishes. Its worth ignoring Indian food for the time, unless you are there for too long.
    Never hit someone below the belt; for you are not the creator.

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    anybody knows an Indian restaurant in Chiang Mai? not a very expensive or fancy place. I know a no-name place in Moon Muang soi 9, but they are vegetarian, and I would be interested in trying more kinds of food. thank you.

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    Hope this helps a little, Betti.

    Have not tried any myself in Chiang Mai.


    http://www.chiangmai-online.com/indian.html

    (scroll down the page)

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    Before I came to Thailand I spent a few weeks in North India.
    The food was not like any Indian food I have had anywhere in the best restaurants and though I did get ill a couple of times the chaat we had on the street was amongst the tastiest (I even got ill eating in nice restaurants in Rishikesh and Delhi). Now in BKK if I want the real taste of India I go to Paharat Soi in Chinatown (Little India) its right next to a sikh temple and they give out food just like in Amritsar, also there are a couple of nice cafes that do good masala chai, dosas, samosas, all the shops round there are Indian and there is the smell of insence everywhere and the spices you need to cook Indian food. Well worth checking out.
    All I need now is a carom board and I'll be happy

  8. #8
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    By coincidence, just found this in todays "Bangkok Post"

    Little india
    A Sikh temple and a market in a corner of Bangkok evoke memories of everything that travellers associate with the Indian subcontinent

    Grocery stores, such as this one, sell everything from spices, cooking oil, sari and bangles to newspapers, film magazines, VCDs and DVDs that are imported from India.

    The aromatic smell of spices and freshly cooked breads told me I was heading in the right direction, towards the Indian district of Pahurat, better known as Bangkok's Little India.

    A short walk from Chinatown, it is home to a thriving Indian community made up largely of Hindus and Sikh who have been living there for generations, actually since Pahurat Road was constructed in 1898 and named after Somdet Chaofah Pahurat Maneemai, the son of King Rama V.

    Pahurat is where tailors come to buy raw materials - cloth, buttons, zips and so forth. And not only them, if you suddenly have the urge to print one thousand invitation cards this is the place to be.

    Walking the lanes and by-lanes of this enchanting community, I discovered that Pahurat's residents are predominantly Sikh. I heard them speak Punjabi, Thai and other Indian dialects. In the back lanes, the strains of Indian music and the savoury aroma of Indian food filled the afternoon air.

    It is a well known fact that the best and most affordable Indian cuisine, sweets, clothes, jewellery and accessories can be found here. The Pahurat market on Chakraphet Road attracts both Thai and overseas visitors.

    The imposing architecture of Sri Guru Singh Sabha Sikh Temple evokes images of a palace than a place of worship. It serves as both a religious hub and meeting point for ethnic Indians in Thailand. The Soi Pratu Lek (Iron Gate) Indian community, a short distance from the Sikh temple, is buzzing with activity, as most Indians still prefer to live side by side their own kind.

    Besides the mouth-watering samosas (curry puff) sold at the corner of Soi Pratu Lek Yai near the old ATM department store, you can purchase textiles, statues and pictures of Indian deities, CDs, VCDs, bracelets, trinkets and sandals. What's more fascinating is that the area behind Pahurat Road, measuring about 200m by 100m, is packed with stalls selling more of what's displayed on the main streets.

    The atmosphere invokes curiosity. So I set out to discover how Little India came about and the role religion played in shaping the lifestyle of its residents.

    Since most of the residents are Sikh, I started at the Sri Guru Singh Sabha, a six-storey Sikh temple in the heart of the community.

    The temple- a white building trimmed in golden yellow and topped off with a glittering golden dome - dates back to 1932. The top floor houses religious scriptures and a reading hall. It has since undergone several renovations and is reputed to be one of the largest Sikh temples outside India. Gutted by fire, the ATM department store next to it is undergoing a major overhaul so the lane leading to the temple is in a rather messy state.

    At the temple, I was introduced to Surin Gulati- a long time parishioner and second generation Thai-Indian. He said, "Very much like the Little Indias in other countries, the one in Bangkok took form because Indians generally like to live with their own kind of people. People from other backgrounds will not understand their culture and traditions."

    Living near a place of worship is also key to the way Indians conduct themselves, he said. At first there were a large number of Thai-Indians residing around the temple. As their number grew, they began relocating to other areas of the city.

    Pahurat is popular for its merchandise that is imported from India. Both Sikhs and Hindus go there to buy goodies and other essential items. Surin said the Sikhs migrated here from the Indian states of Rajasthan, Punjab, Himachal Pradesh and Pakistan-occupied Punjab in search of greener pastures. Today many of them are in the textile business in Sampheng and Pahurat districts, but the younger generation are branching out to pursue their own interests and talents.

    Asked why Indians have a reputation for being in the textile business, Surin explained that in the past owning a cloth shop in Sampheng was considered prestigious. Since then it has become a trend.

    Housewife Rani Bedi, who lives within a stone's throw from the temple, said that religion is an integral part of an Indian's day to day life. What's more, the temple serves as a venue for both prayers and fellowship. The place of worship is open to everyone.

    Sikhs are also big on charity work. Two hundred boxes of vegetarian food from a communal kitchen (langar) in the temple compound is given out to people every day at the Old Siam Plaza, a spacious shopping centre with old colonial design that's in stark contrast to the congestion just across the street.

    Being a first-time visitor, I found it interesting observing the congregation of Sikh men with long beards and turbans, and women in traditional costume, their head draped in shawl, listening to the holy scriptures read by a priest.

    A second-generation Thai-Indian, Rani has lived in the Pratu Lek area for three decades. Like many Sikhs born in Thailand, she speaks fluent Thai and Punjabi. But I was curious to know if she felt more Thai or Indian. Breaking into a smile, she said that a good part of her felt Thai, largely because she grew up here and had formed close friendships with Thai people. However, her Sikh faith and traditions, which have to an extent become more flexible over the years, made her feel connected to India.

    She has observed some major changes in the lifestyle of people living in her community. One of them is the frequency with which women are allowed to refuse marriage proposals, and the liberty to work outside their home.

    It is also getting more acceptable for Indian men to marry Thai women, although the same can't be said of women, who are still expected to marry a man from their own race. What has not changed is the fervour with which Thais of Indian origin follow their traditions in their daily life. Most people prefer to live together - the uncles, aunts and grandparents live under the same roof. Still a constant fixture are the ritual evening tea with the elders, and dropping by to a neighbour's house for a quick chat before retiring for the day.

    Watching Indian DVD movies and listening to music is also a favourite pastime. That is why the Indian market is an integral part of their daily lives. Incense sticks, myrrh, and other items that Indians offer to appease their gods and goddesses can be found here.

    The walking tour of Little India was an eventful experience for it gave me an insight into the Indian way of life in Thailand and appreciate the differences found in our society. I must say Pahurat truly offers the tastes, smells and sights of enchanting India on Thai soil.

    http://www.bangkokpost.net/270406_Ho...06_hori001.php
    Last edited by Khun Don; 30-04-06 at 07:19 AM.

  9. #9
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    Yeah maybe I met Surin. I went to the temple with my GF as I'd been to Pahurat before but had never been inside the temple, so we went to check it out. We were met just inside by a very genial old man who then took us around the temple and showed us all the finer points and historical points, stuff we would never have known. Then he suggested some places to eat and bade us well. We'll go back there soon

  10. #10
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    thanks Khun Don, I had missed out on your reply.

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